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Tuition crisis spurs new community fund

 
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The Rabbinical Council of Bergen County last week unanimously voiced its support of a community fund to raise money for day schools struggling with rising costs and skyrocketing tuitions.

Following the vote, the Northern New Jersey Tuition Crisis Committee, the group of day school representatives and rabbis that proposed the kehilla fund, its unofficial name, filed incorporation papers to create Northern New Jersey Jewish Education for Generations Inc.

The nonprofit organization will manage the fund — to be called Northern New Jersey Kehillot Investing in Day Schools, or NNJKIDS.

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Rabbi Shmuel Goldin, co-chair of the Northern New Jersey Tuition Crisis Committee, is spearheading efforts to set up a communal fund for day school tuition.

“This is a major step in educating the community as a whole to the fact that Jewish education is a communal issue rather than simply a parental issue,” said Rabbi Shmuel Goldin, co-chair of the Northern New Jersey Tuition Crisis Committee and religious leader of Englewood’s Cong. Ahavath Torah. “We’re trying to move away from the tuition-based model alone to a model of broad-based support.”

The 23 rabbis of the RCBC, representing all Orthodox synagogues in Bergen County, agreed to dedicate an upcoming sermon in each congregation to encouraging regular donations to the fund through a Website expected to launch the first week in June.

The rabbis will also appoint “implementers” to lead efforts in their synagogues to promote contributions. The Orthodox Union will provide fliers and other printed materials to draw attention to the funds within the synagogues.

The idea for a community fund was put forward at an OU conference on the tuition crisis earlier this year, and the organization advised the tuition committee in developing the fund.

The money raised, Goldin said, will be used to aid scholarship programs in order to reduce the tuition burden. The solution to the crisis, he said, lies in changing the way the wider community views day school education.

“The purpose is to raise as much money as possible,” said Gershon Distenfeld, a member of the tuition committee and a board member of the Rosenbaum Yeshiva of North Jersey in River Edge, “but more importantly [also] to get as close to 100 percent participation as possible to demonstrate that the funding of our schools is really a communal obligation.”

As such, the volume of the donor base will be a higher measure of success than the size of the donations in the beginning, he said. Organizers initially plan to ask for a minimum of $30 a month from donors.

“Even an unemployed person can do a few dollars a month,” said Rabbi Saul Zucker, director of the OU’s Department of Day School and Educational Services. “The Talmud speaks about how even poor people who get charity should give charity. There is a very basic heartfelt Jewish value in this model.”

The tax-deductible donations will be pooled bimonthly and then divided among elementary- level day schools within the catchments area of UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey, which includes Bergen County and Wayne in Passaic County. Distribution will be determined based on the number of students at each school.

“This whole effort is aimed at lessening the burden on local families, so we think it’s most appropriate to allocate based on the number of local kids in each school,” Distenfeld said.

Zucker pointed to the government’s system of property taxes as an example of how the system should work. Property taxes fund the public school system, and every homeowner pays regardless of whether they have children in the schools. Jewish educators must create a similar sense of responsibility for the day schools within the larger Jewish community, he said.

“We benefit from the presence of the day schools in the community,” Zucker said. “It enhances the essential nature and flavor of the Jewish community.”

The fund is geared toward the elementary schools, organizers said, because of their generally lower cost than high schools, and because they tend to have more local children. Families are more willing to send their children to high schools in New York, such as Ramaz or the Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway. Likewise, area yeshiva high schools have more students from outside the county than the elementary schools.

At Torah Academy of Bergen County in Teaneck, for example, 45 percent of the students come from outside the county, said Rabbi Yosef Adler, the school’s rosh yeshiva, the religious leader of Teaneck’s Cong. Rinat Yisrael, and a member of the RCBC.

Even though his school will not benefit from the fund, Adler supported the initiative, calling it “laudable.”

The average annual cost of one year of elementary-level day school falls between $13,000 and $15,000. That number increases well above $20,000 on the high school level. Orthodox families tend to be larger than average, with three or more children — all of whom usually attend day school through the end of high school. For a family earning $200,000 a year — considered wealthy in government tax brackets — the cost of education can be overwhelming.

The kehillah fund will not solve the tuition crisis, but it is a good first step, Distenfeld said. Every dollar raised by the fund is a dollar the schools do not have to charge in tuition, he added.

“The impact is going to be on funds available for scholarship, which will mitigate future tuition increases,” he said.

Although the tuition committee includes representatives from the Solomon Schechter day schools of the Conservative movement, NNJKIDs will distribute funds only to Orthodox schools, because Orthodox rabbis are leading the fundraising in their shuls.

“Since [the fund is] operating through the shuls, the revenue collected in Orthodox shuls will go toward the schools that have a religious affiliation with those shuls,” Zucker said, noting that a parallel track through Conservative synagogues will be added at a later time.

“Conservative and Reform synagogues can use the exact same model for affiliated schools,” he added. “This is replicable. We’re very happy to share the model for the non-Orthodox schools.”

Other initiatives are under consideration, including a broader community fund and discussions with UJA-NNJ about seeking out large donors, Goldin said. Schechter would reap the benefits of these components once they are launched, he added.

NNJKIDS, the rabbi said, is “the first step to the creation of an overall tuition fund in the community.”

 
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Pruzansky vs. Matanky

Rabbi’s Nazi analogy draws fire

The president of the Rabbinical Council of American, Rabbi Leonard Matanky, has weighed in on the ongoing dispute between Rabbi Steven Pruzansky of Congregation Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck and Gary Rosenblatt of Teaneck, editor and publisher of New York’s Jewish Week.

“I am pained that I have to distance myself from a colleague, but the kind of language that Rabbi Pruzansky used is unacceptable and crosses the line of decency and discourse,” Rabbi Matanky is quoted in the Jewish Week as having written. (Rabbi Matanky lives in Chicago’s West Rogers Park neighborhood — which is more or less the Teaneck of the Midwest — where he is rabbi of Congregations K.I.N.S. and dean of the Ida Crown Jewish Academy.)

 

What did he know? When did he know it?

State Senate majority leader Loretta Weinberg discusses GWB scandal interim report

On Monday, the New Jersey state legislative committee investigating Bridgegate submitted an interim report.

Anyone expecting a final answer to the question of what did he know and when did he know it — or to be more specific, how much did Governor Chris Christie know about the closure of the three local lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge, creating potentially lethal havoc in Fort Lee, and when did he learn that his aides had been responsible for it — would be disappointed.

Still, there are nuggets there about the scandal, lying ready for gleaning.

This is very much an interim report, Loretta Weinberg stressed. Ms. Weinberg, a Democrat, is the state Senate’s majority leader. She lives in Teaneck, and Fort Lee is in her district.

 

Reality check

Author to discuss intergenerational ‘experiment’

Katie Hafner began her professional career writing for a small newspaper in Lake Tahoe.

That didn’t last for long, though. “I worked my way up,” said Ms. Hafner, who now writes on health care for the New York Times.

A seasoned journalist, Ms. Hafner was exceptionally well prepared to chronicle an experience in her own life that she calls both an “experiment in intergenerational living” and a “disaster.” Inviting her 77-year-old mother to live with her and her teenage daughter, Zoe, in San Francisco, Ms. Hafner learned that fairy-tale imaginings are no match for emotional truths.

(In her book, Ms. Hafner calls her mother Helen. That is not her real name; her mother requested anonymity, and Ms. Hafner honored the request.)

 

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It’s hard to sign on to social media these days without seeing a right-wing news article decrying President Obama’s relationship with Israel. Despite a plethora of stories of how the president is abandoning Israel, “the current status of the U.S.-Israel relationship is very strong,” Dr. Ben Chouake, Norpac’s president, said.
 

David Zvi and Josh’s excellent bentscher adventure

How two friends came to craft Seder Oneg Shabbos, a book of Grace and beauty

Much of our aesthetic today is reflected in Apple.

It’s clean, sleek, and spare. It understands the elegance of white space and the rapture of restraint. It implies but does not promise. It does not hector, it does not natter at us.

It is cool, and it also is cold.

So maybe you’re finishing Shabbat dinner. It’s winter outside but warm in the dining room, full of family and friends and wine and challah and chocolate and song. Or maybe it’s a wedding of good friends, and you’ve eaten well if not wisely, and danced every calorie away.

It’s time to bentsh, to say the Birchat Hamazon — the long blessings after a meal that observant Jews often say to themselves quickly after ordinary meals but might sing loudly together at the end of more festive ones.

 

Norpac hosts fundraiser for Huckabee

The dust is still settling from the 2014 midterm elections, but the race to 2016 is already on. Potential presidential candidates already have started lining up donors.

Norpac, the North Jersey pro-Israel political action committee, regularly holds fundraisers for incumbents. When there is no incumbent, as there will not be in the presidential race in 2016, it raises funds for candidates who have strong records on Israel. On Saturday night, the Englewood-based group held a fundraiser that drew about 35 people and collected at least $40,000 for Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor and one-time Republican presidential hopeful who now is a commentator on Fox News.

But — Mr. Huckabee hasn’t declared himself a candidate for 2016 yet, so the fundraiser officially was for Mr. Huckabee’s 501(c)4 non-profit, America Takes Action.

Many candidates have issue-related organizations, such as Bill Clinton’s Clinton Global Initiative. Fundraising events for such organizations don’t contribute directly to a political campaign. They do allow the candidate to send a message about which issues are important to him or her, however, and they create opportunities for Norpac’s members to gain access to the potential candidate.

 
 
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