Subscribe to The Jewish Standard free weekly newsletter

 
font size: +
 

Beyond Birthright

Continuing the journey

 
|| Tell-a-Friend || Print
 
 

Squirrels are running rampant in the rafters of a synagogue. Desperate to find a way to deal with the pests, the rabbi decides to bar mitzvah them. The day after, the squirrels leave the synagogue and never come back.

This old joke tells the sad truth about the many b’nai mitzvah kids who disappear from synagogue life after the ceremony. To bring those teens back into the fold, a group of philanthropists created Birthright Israel nine years ago, offering Jewish young adults free trips to Israel to ignite their passion for Judaism.

image
Rabbi Ely Allen says the Jewish community needs to do a better job reaching out to Jewish young adults.

The program has had enormous success in sending more than 100,000 Jews to the holy land. Many participants get more involved in Jewish life on their respective campuses after the trip, but new research points to a staggering 44 percent of Birthright alumni who stop attending Jewish events after college. (See related story, Beyond Birthright — Report: Communities must do more to attract alums.)

That figure is representative of a larger problem in the Jewish community, said Rabbi Ely Allen, director of Hillel at UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey, which operates on four area college campuses.

UJA-NNJ will sponsor its third Birthright trip this summer, which will bring the number of participants on its trips to 120. Some participants are from the local colleges, while others are area residents who go to schools elsewhere. On campus, about 80 percent of Birthright alumni stay active in Jewish life, Allen said, but Hillel can only offer so much. The larger Jewish community is not focused on what happens to Jews after they leave college, which makes the Birthright experience more of an isolated event, he said.

Follow-up “has to be an important part of the federation world and the Jewish education scene,” he said. “You can’t just expect people to have a 10-day trip and no follow-up … to carry them through their Jewish lives.”

An editorial in this newspaper last month lamented the lack of Jewish social opportunities for young adults outside of New York City. Allen agreed, adding that the Jewish community largely has been ignoring the population.

“There need to be organizations for young adults,” he said. “That’s the time we’re most likely going to lose them.”

Allen praised organizations such as Birthright Next that offer opportunities for alumni, but chastised the larger Jewish communal world for not following suit.

image
Amy Winn-Dworkin

“If all these Jewish organizations want to have a next generation, there needs to be programming,” he said. “There needs to be a concerted effort and teamwork among all the organizations. We have to have the same [effort] for after they graduate from college.”

While most students stay active in Jewish life on campus after Birthright, Allen has noticed the falling away of about 15 percent to 20 percent of Birthright participants on his campuses. He had no answer as to why.

In addition to his work with Hillel, the rabbi runs classes and Shabbatons out of his home, open to students and young adults in the community. He sees many young adults who are out of college and have few other groups reaching out to them in the area.

Natalia Kadish attends events at Allen’s with her husband, Aaron. They both went on Birthright through Ma’ayanot, although on different trips. Kadish praised the trip but said that now that she and her spouse are out of college and living in Teaneck, they need more support. Both are in their mid-20s and feel that only Allen and another Teaneck family that hosts Shabbatons have consistently reached out to their age group, she said.

“I’m very blessed to have Ely and the Shulman family, and all our chevra,” she said, “but if it weren’t for Ely’s family and the Shulmans, my heart would not be as close to HaShem.”

To highlight the need for more outreach, Kadish paraphrased a quote from the band Tool: “If no one was here to see us through the tedious path we have chosen, we might have walked away by now.”

Debra Segal, who works for The Cornerstone Group in New York, has lived in Teaneck with her family since seventh grade and says there has never been any programming for her generation. She is active in her synagogue but says that it mostly reaches out only to young children. Now 20, Segal remains involved, but laments that the larger community still hasn’t extended itself to her demographic.

“People recognize that this is something we have to work on,” Allen said. “There are plans and things happening. At this time when we’re going through all these cuts, I hope there will be an increase in investment in young adults and who’s going to the future leadership of the Jewish community.”

The full impact of Birthright won’t be seen for a few more years, said Amy Winn-Dworkin, UJA-NNJ’s director of Birthright Israel Support. Those among the 18-26 age group that Birthright targets are either still in college or, in the case of the organization’s oldest alumni, still in the early stages of their careers and adult lives.

Winn-Dworkin argued that enough time has not passed to determine the full impact of Birthright on its participants. The years between ages 18 and 26 can be filled with critical decisions and Birthright could later affect whom alumni marry, how they raise their children, and how active they are in Jewish life.

“It’s going to be a constant research experiment to see what happens,” she said. “The people we are sending to Israel today, in this generation, are future shul presidents, federation presidents, mayors, heads of states, CEOs.”

Since going on Birthright in 2006 with Hillel at Penn State University, Perry Bindelglass, 22, has remained active in Jewish life. He has volunteered with UJA-NNJ for Super Sunday and other fund-raising events, and is an active booster of Birthright.

“I was always involved but because of my parents. I grew up with it,” he said. His parents, Gale and David of Franklin Lakes, are active in organizing and fund-raising for UJA-NNJ events.

After Birthright, Bindelglass would continue to run into other participants around campus. Some graduated soon after they got back, some he would see only at High Holiday services, but they always had a bond, he said.

“Any time I meet somebody who’s gone on the trip, we’ve connected,” he said.

Now Bindelglass lives in Washington and, while he has met with the president of the local federation, he has not yet gotten involved with the organization.

“It’s a little harder now,” he said. “But I’m still involved as much as I can be.”

UJA-NNJ does not offer formal Birthright alumni programming. Such organizations exist in New York, but for local Birthright alumni still in college those programs can be difficult to attend.

“We have tried a couple of times to try to engage alumni into other federation activities but it doesn’t work as well because most of our alumni are going to college out of the area,” Winn-Dworkin said.

Within the next seven to 10 years, Winn-Dworkin expects to see those numbers begin to change, and hopes the federation will be able to attract more alumni to its events. Many recent college graduates head to the city rather than the suburbs, but as they eventually marry and have children, northern New Jersey becomes more popular. That shared Birthright experience from college might be the foundation to build upon later.

“Trying to still maintain that Birthright connection might be something important for us to look at,” Winn-Dworkin said. “The value of this program is it creates connections where other things have not. This is going to be the future of our community.”

 

More on: Beyond Birthright

 
 
 

Report: Communities must do more to attract alums

Nearly 160,000 young Jews from North America have taken part in Taglit-Birthright Israel, a 10-day free Israel trip aimed at revving up their Jewish identities.

Of those no longer in college, only half have attended any Jewish event since their return.

That’s one of the findings of “Tourists, Travelers, and Citizens,” a new report by the Cohen Center of Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University. The report is based on interviews and online surveys of 1,534 Birthright alumni in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Toronto, the four largest Jewish communities in North America.

 
 
 
|| Tell-a-Friend || Print
 
 

Stay tuned for the return of comments

 

Remembering Rochelle Shoretz

Sharsheret founder, dead of breast cancer at 42, recalled, through tears, with great love

The skies were stormy last Sunday when Rochelle Shoretz, 42, succumbed to complications from breast cancer.

Rain continued falling Monday as more than 500 people gathered at Gutterman and Musicant in Hackensack to mourn and eulogize the mother of two teenage sons, who lived in Teaneck and was the founder and executive director of Sharsheret, a locally based national nonprofit organization providing health information and support services for thousands of young Jewish women living with breast or ovarian cancer.

Many of her friends and relatives said that the rainy gray horizon seemed symbolic of the great light that was leaving this world.

In his eulogy, Rabbi Shalom Baum of Congregation Keter Torah in Teaneck noted that this Shabbat’s Torah portion centers on the kindling of the eternal light in the Temple sanctuary. “It seems that, ironically, our light — Rochie Shoretz — has been extinguished,” he said. “But she would reject that conclusion categorically. … Rochie, you are already a light to so many.”

 

Welcome WIZO

Women’s International Zionist Organization opens local branch

What’s WIZO, and why might it make you think of Julius Caesar?

Think about dividing a large territory into regions.

WIZO is not a shortened version of Dorothy’s magic-performing over-the-rainbow friend the Wizard of Oz, but the very serious and very successful Women’s International Zionist Organization. If you haven’t heard of it (and if you live in the United States, the odds are that you haven’t), that’s where the Julius Caesar part comes in.

Caesar, remember, famously wrote that “All Gaul is divided into three parts.” The founders of women’s Zionist organizations were even more ambitious than the conquerors of the French. They divided the world into just two parts. Hadassah — an organization you most definitely have heard of — got the United States, “and WIZO got the world,” Galina Shenfeld said.

 

Turning point

Local man rises above injury to start home health aide venture

Ronald Gold’s life is so dramatic that it’s hard to resist the temptation to start with a cliché.

The story of his life is about the moment when everything changed, the second that split it inexorably into before and after. The time when he almost died, when his understanding of himself in the physical world ended, when through great pain he was reborn.

But really, the person Mr. Gold became after the terrible accident that rendered him paraplegic was a logical outgrowth of the person he was before. His integrity, athleticism, ambition, courage, tenacity, brains, competitiveness, and strength — as well as, yes, his deep Jewish connections — not only saved his life but allowed him to embark on this next part of it.

 

RECENTLYADDED

Turning point

Local man rises above injury to start home health aide venture

Ronald Gold’s life is so dramatic that it’s hard to resist the temptation to start with a cliché.

The story of his life is about the moment when everything changed, the second that split it inexorably into before and after. The time when he almost died, when his understanding of himself in the physical world ended, when through great pain he was reborn.

But really, the person Mr. Gold became after the terrible accident that rendered him paraplegic was a logical outgrowth of the person he was before. His integrity, athleticism, ambition, courage, tenacity, brains, competitiveness, and strength — as well as, yes, his deep Jewish connections — not only saved his life but allowed him to embark on this next part of it.

 

Working for smart guns

Mahwah rabbi forms coalition to help cut back on gun violence

It would have been entirely understandable if Rabbi Joel Mosbacher wanted to ban all guns. Just collect them all, melt them into a lump, and be done with it.

Rabbi Mosbacher’s father, Lester Mosbacher, was eulogized as a “gentle soul” in 1992; he died, at 52, after he was shot by a burglar who was holding up his store on Chicago’s South Side.

His murder was the textbook definition of pointless — Mr. Mosbacher was shot in the head and arm by a petty thief who got nothing from the robbery and was tried, convicted, and then released for retrial, which never happened. Nothing ever happened, except that Mr. Mosbacher remained dead.

For years, Rabbi Mosbacher, the spiritual leader of Beth Haverim Shir Shalom in Mahwah, bottled his rage. And then, just a few years ago, he took its distilled essence, nourished by news stories of other shootings, equally senseless, like his father’s murder causing sudden, catastrophic, and lifelong pain to survivors as their own lives had to reweave themselves around a gaping hole, to lead a new campaign.

 

Working for smart guns

Rabbi Mosbacher reacts to the Charleston massacre Last week’s shooting at the Emanuel A.M.E. church in Charleston, South Carolin

Last week’s shooting at the Emanuel A.M.E. church in Charleston, South Carolina, which left nine people dead after their murderer, Dylann Roof, sat with them at Bible study for nearly an hour before spouting racists tropes as he gunned them down, has brought the issue, which always simmers just below the surface, to an angry boil.

“On the one hand, Charleston is another in a series of mass shootings that seem to happen almost weekly at this point,” Rabbi Mosbacher said. “That speaks to part of the core of this problem, which is access to guns. People will say all sorts of things. They say it is a question of mental health. Yes, it is — but it’s not fundamentally about mental health. I don’t think that we have significantly more mental health problems here than in Europe.” But laws controlling gun ownership are far more stringent in the rest of the Western world, and the numbers of shootings are correspondingly lower.

 
 
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31