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After-school ‘open yeshiva’ program proposed in Teaneck

 
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As the community continues to struggle with the high costs of Jewish day school, the Jewish Center of Teaneck is planning to launch an after-school program in the fall to supplement a public school education.

The synagogue’s Rabbi Lawrence Zierler revealed plans on Tuesday for what he called “an open yeshiva.” The four-day a week after-school program geared toward fifth-, sixth-, and seventh-graders will provide b’nai mitzvah preparation, Jewish education, and Hebrew language arts.

“With this economic crisis there will definitely be families that can no longer afford going to the day schools and will be looking for some way for their children to still get a secular education and follow that up with a Jewish education,” said Eva Gans, the center’s expected incoming president. “If this works for them then we’re doing a service for the community.”

Zierler noted that he grew up in a day-school environment and supports that model for Jewish education. He lamented that the economic downturn has made paying the already high tuition impossible for some. The center, he said, is in a position to help because of its large physical plant. The motivation behind the school is the need to be responsible and responsive, he said, emphasizing that it is not meant to diminish the day-school system.

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The Jewish Center of Teaneck is planning to offer an intensive after-school “open yeshiva.” The synagogue was the site of the now-defunct Metropolitan Schechter High School.

“That remains an important Jewish value,” he said. “We as a community should not find ourselves with students [leaving day school and] flailing about aimlessly and say, ‘Now what?’ Preparedness is also a Jewish responsibility.”

While bar and bat mitzvah preparation will be one focus of the new program, students will select one of three additional tracks in Jewish studies. Beyond learning the “geography” of the siddur, students will also take trips to see how Jewish values can be applied to everyday life, Zierler said.

“It’s not an old-fashioned cheder,” he said, referring to the classical model of intensive Hebrew programs. “It’s giving people the skills you need to live well as a Jew but at the same time in an exciting environment.”

Zierler dismissed concerns about adding another two hours of classes to a public-school student’s day. A day-school schedule typically runs until 5 p.m. or later, so the time commitment from a public school student would parallel the day-school schedule. Although the school is geared toward students who moved to public school from the day-school system, it will be open to students of all backgrounds, including all Jewish movements, he said.

“It has enough of the traditional for the traditional family but can also be a gateway opportunity for people coming from other parts of the denominational spectrum,” he said.

While the program has not yet been finalized, Zierler expected the cost to parents to be between $3,000 and $5,000 per student — significantly less than tuition for a day-school education, which can reach as high as $25,000 per student.

“Now the cost factor is huge, and for some families it’s going to become a barrier,” Zierler said.

“Business can’t be as usual in Jewish education,” he continued. “Part of it is a question of [becoming] ‘leaner and meaner.’ I don’t necessarily think we should be using words like ‘no frills’ — I don’t want it to become a caste system — but we’re going to have to do more with less.”

“No frills” was a reference to the idea of a low-cost yeshiva model under discussion in Englewood. A group of day-school parents concerned about tuition costs is investigating a new school track for $6,500 per student. To make the program work, the group is looking to increase class sizes, cut staff, and reduce such co-curricular programming as art, music, and gym.

With an intensive after-school Hebrew program available to public-school students, the elementary schools could find themselves more vulnerable in coming months.

Ruth Gafni, head of the Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County in New Milford, declined comment on the specific proposal. The elementary school recently announced at least a dozen layoffs among its staff.

“As a school we have looked at the student body for next year and had to make some adjustments faculty-wise and staff-wise for what we will have at school,” she said.

The size of next year’s enrollment has not yet been determined. The school has just more than 500 students, about 100 fewer than three years ago.

“As Jewish day-school leaders we have gotten together on many levels to try to support and keep our students in our schools,” she said. “We do believe a day-school education is most important and we would like our students to stay where they are.”

Calls to Yavneh Academy in Paramus and The Moriah School in Englewood were not returned by press time.

Raphael Bachrach, the Englewood man who is trying to create a Hebrew immersion program in one of that city’s public elementary schools, thought the travel time necessary would be too great for the Jewish Center to supplement his proposed program. He could not, however, adequately weigh in on the JCT plan without more information, he said.

The Hebrew immersion program, meanwhile, remains in limbo waiting for movement from the Englewood school board. Bachrach, who last year tried unsuccessfully to create a Hebrew charter school, has resubmitted the application for that school to the state. The state board of education has until September to make a decision.

“Any addition to the fabric of Jewish education in the community is welcome,” said Rabbi Shmuel Goldin of Cong. Ahavath Torah. “Certainly a program that would enrich the Jewish experience for public school students is deserving of support.”

Goldin has been working with parents, the Rabbinical Council of Bergen County, UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey, and representatives of day schools, including Schechter, to address the tuition crisis. The RCBC was scheduled to meet Wednesday night to begin work on creating a community fund to aid area day schools.

“Our experience has shown that day-school education is still the best educational option available for students from the Jewish community,” Goldin said. “I would hope that the efforts being made on a communal basis to make that education more affordable will keep children in the day schools and will attract others to the day schools.”

 
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Praying while female at the Kotel

Women of the Wall representative to speak locally

What’s going on with the Women of the Wall now?

What’s happening with gender equality and pluralism in Israel, now that the Israeli election is over?

Women of the Wall, made up of women from across the Jewish spectrum, has fought for the right to pray at the Kotel — Jerusalem’s Western Wall, the symbolic center of Jewish life, the magnet that draws observant and non-observant Jews, non-Jews, poets, and often even skeptics, close to it, as if they were pure iron filings.

The group, which was formed in the late 1980s, has been bolstered by legal wins. Its most important recent victory was the April 2013 decision by Judge Moshe Sobel of the Jerusalem District Court, who ruled that the city police were wrong when they arrested five women for the crime of wearing tallitot at the women’s section of the Kotel.

 

Twenty years later

Stephen Flatow remembers his murdered daughter Alisa

When you ask attorney Stephen Flatow of West Orange how many children he has, his answer is immediate.

“I have five children,” he says.

Not surprising. What father doesn’t know how many children he has?

And how are they doing?

Four of them are flourishing; they are all married and all parents. Mr. Flatow and his wife, Rosalyn, have 13 grandchildren, and another one’s on the way. (And three of the Flatows’ children live in Bergen County.)

But the fifth, his oldest, Alisa, was murdered by terrorists when she was 20; her 20th yahrzeit was last week. She has been dead as long as she was alive.

“Just because she isn’t there now, that doesn’t mean I’m not her father,” he said. “I just don’t have any recent pictures of her to show.”

 

‘A do-it-yourself disease’

Before Saddle Brook walk, families of ALS patients talk about the disease’s impact

In early 2014, just shy of his 12th birthday, Eitan David Jacobi of Teaneck told his parents he was having trouble raising his arms. It was particularly hard for him to shoot basketballs.

This was a first for the youngster, said his mother, Rabbi Lori Forman-Jacobi, who described her son as an active, funny, and very social kid.

In fact, she said, he had spent the previous summer as a camper at Ramah Nyack. And when he fell off a horse in early November, “we told him to get back on.” Usually that’s good advice. But Eitan did not have the strength to stay on the horse.

“We didn’t have a clue,” Rabbi Forman-Jacobi, a past vice-principal of the Bergen County High School of Jewish Studies. “It took us until Thanksgiving to get to a neurologist.” By that time, Eitan was “unable to reach to get to the microwave or to open cabinets.”

 

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Should we toughen or baby our kids?

Panel at Emanuel at Franklin Lakes to look at innocence, experience, expectations

Say you begin with the assumption that just about everything in life demands a balance — between work and pleasure, home and office, family and friends, saving and spending, responsibility and heedlessness, tradition and change. That’s just part of being an adult. Maybe you can call it the balance between pleasure and pain.

But what about children? What about adolescents? What do they have to balance? What do we as their parents have to balance for them?

That’s what Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser’s latest panel, “Preserving Youthful Innocence…or Teaching Adult Responsibilities… What Do We Owe Our Children?” will explore.

Rabbi Prouser, who heads Temple Emanuel of North Jersey in Franklin Lakes, said that we — parents, educators, leaders, and the community in general — have two very different sets of responsibilities toward our children. “One is to teach them adult responsibilities, to help them grow up,” he said. “The other is the critical responsibility to protect and preserve their innocence, to keep them as children so they can have a full, wholesome experience of childhood.

 

Yvette Tekel, 1925-2015

Community mourns loss of beloved leader ‘active in anything Jewish’

The loss of Yvette Tekel will be keenly felt throughout our community and beyond its borders.

Indeed, the words family, friends, and colleagues — across communities, across organizations — used to describe Ms. Tekel — who recently moved to Fort Lee from Haworth — paint a picture of a woman who brought joy and inspiration to all who knew her.

“She was a five-foot giant,” said her husband, Louis, singing the praises of his nearly 90-year-old wife to Rabbi David-Seth Kirshner, who conducted Yvette’s funeral on May 20 at Temple Emanu-El of Closter. The couple had been married for 68 years.

Lou, who worked in the linen business and was a decorated hero of World War II, “was chairman of the Yvette fan club,” Rabbi Kirshner said. “He supported her and stood by her side” in all her many charitable endeavors.

 

Mark the SPOT

Family of melanoma victim works with hair stylists to raise awareness

Less than two years have gone by since Rachel Samitt noticed a suspicious mole under the wet hair on her dad’s sunlit scalp after a swim in the family’s Woodcliff Lake pool.

Though Mark Samitt immediately made an appointment with his dermatologist, the skin cancer his daughter saw took his life on May 6. He was 52.

Mr. Samitt’s tragic death makes this Sunday’s cut-a-thon all the more poignant — and vital. Mark the SPOT, a program he launched with his wife, Gayle, and daughters Rachel and Danielle, in partnership with the Melanoma Research Foundation, will be held at six Pascack Valley-area salons. Its goal is to teach hairstylists that “If you spot something, say something.”

Mark the SPOT educates stylists about how to identify possibly cancerous marks on their customers’ heads or necks and how to communicate their findings in a way that does not panic but encourages the customer to seek medical attention. The first salon to host a training session was Mania Hair Studio in Park Ridge. Owner Phil Mania lost his own father to melanoma at a young age.

 
 
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