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Schizophrenia research and the Jews

 
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In the late 1990s the Department of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University placed an advertisement in a number of newspapers, including this one, recruiting Jewish research subjects. The ad read: “Ashkenazi Jewish families are needed to help scientists understand the biological basis for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.” Now a new study recruiting schizophrenia patients in northern New Jersey is seeking volunteers. Although that study is recruiting from the Jewish community as well as the general population (see related story), past studies have targeted Jewish populations, in particular Ashkenazi Jews. Has this occurred because Jews are more likely to suffer from mental illness than other groups? Scientific research has not supported this notion; experts estimate the incidence of schizophrenia in the Ashkenazi Jewish population to be no higher than that of the general population (about one percent).

Why would scientists be so interested in studying mental illness in Jewish groups? Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder that is thought to occur as a result of the interaction of multiple genetic factors and environmental factors. One way the genetic contribution has been analyzed is by using twin studies, which reveal that identical twins — who share all their genes — have significantly higher concordance for schizophrenia (i.e., where both have the disease) than do fraternal twins (who share about 50 percent of their genes). That outcome supports the idea that schizophrenia has a significant genetic basis.

On its Website, the Johns Hopkins program explained its justification for using Jewish populations. “Due to a long history of marriage within the faith, which extends back thousands of years, the Jewish community has emerged from a limited number of ancestors and has a similar genetic makeup. This allows researchers to more easily perform genetic studies and locate disease-causing genes.” (See http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/epigen/ashkenazim.htm.) Thus, disease genes may be easier to identify in a more homogeneous genetic population. Ashkenazi Jews have served as a very convenient and generally willing group for research studies. In addition, since it is a fairly homogeneous group, the Ashkenazi population is useful for studies on other aspects of schizophrenia, such as response to, and efficacy of, psychiatric drugs.

It is important to remember that schizophrenia is not determined only by genetic factors. Environmental factors can play an important role in triggering the disease. They can include obstetric complications, infections, substance abuse, and social adversity. Schizophrenia is also hard to study since its diagnosis is often complex. There is no single symptom or disease-specific marker that permits clear diagnosis. There is also considerable variability in the mode and extent that schizophrenia is expressed in patients.

Dr. Ann Pulver, of Johns Hopkins Medical Center, has conducted research on the genetics of schizophrenia over many years and has published numerous papers pertaining to the genetic factors involved in the disease. Every person inherits tens of thousands of genes from his or her parents and those genes contain chemical instructions for development and physical makeup, determining an individual’s functioning, health, and predisposition to disease. The instructions, encoded in DNA, are located on the 23 pairs of chromosomes — the microscopic genetic packages found in every cell of the body.

Pulver’s group and other scientific collaborators have identified some genetic markers that are associated with mental disease. For instance, they discovered that on chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 8, 11, 12, and 18 there are sites that may be associated with bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder. Pulver’s research also showed that chromosomes 10 and 22 harbor candidates for schizophrenia-susceptibility genes that may increase a person’s chance of developing the disease.

The brain is an incredibly complex organ, hence it is no surprise that the genetic underpinnings of schizophrenia appear to be complex, and that researchers have not identified a single specific gene that causes the disease. In order to analyze the data from the many scientists working on this problem, a centralized Website (http://www.schizophreniaforum.org) was developed to catalogue the numerous studies and try to make sense of conflicting data. The goal of the Website is to serve as a central repository for data on the genetics of schizophrenia, provide the opportunity to determine which studies are consistent with one another, and reconcile studies that have conflicting results.

In more than 1,400 studies, scientists have reported on an astounding 761 genes that may be associated with a predisposition to schizophrenia. The Website lists the top 29 genes and reports which studies found a link between a gene and the disease and which studies found no link. Some of the genes listed include: DISC1 (“disrupted in schizophrenia” 1), located on chromosome 1; GABRB2 (a gene for a brain protein that binds neurotransmitters) on chromosome 5; and DRD2 (a dopamine receptor gene) on chromosome 11.

One example of conflicting research results pertains to the COMT gene, which produces an important brain enzyme. Studies by Israeli researchers at Hebrew University, together with scientists at the pharmaceutical company IDgene, suggested that a variant of the COMT gene, located on chromosome 22, was linked to schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews. But a group of British researchers failed to find this link in the two groups they studied: Ashkenazi Jews and Irish subjects. Thus the significance of COMT in development of schizophrenia is still unresolved.

A 2008 study published by collaborating scientists from Israel, England, China, Ireland, and the United States suggested RELN, the reelin gene, as a new candidate for a schizophrenia gene. The study showed that a variant of reelin, a gene known to have a role in brain development, is associated with higher incidence of schizophrenia in females. It is not clear why there would be a link between this gene and schizophrenia in women but not in men. The authors acknowledge that “despite the relatively large heritability of schizophrenia, efforts to identify the molecular risk factor have so far yielded equivocal results.”

Pulver reports that these types of studies are critical to gain better understanding of the disease and to find more effective treatments. She pointed out one flaw in past research projects that should be addressed and remedied: “The majority of people coming into our study are men,” she said. “Men are over-represented in our studies; it’s 3 to 1, men to women.”

“This has great implications for females in clinical studies,” explained Pulver, who encourages women to participate in clinical trials. Many studies of drugs, for instance, can reveal which drug had the fewest negative consequences and the best responses. Those studies are mainly based on male subjects. “But men and women are different,” said Pulver. “We need to identify more Ashkenazi Jewish women with schizophrenia. These studies are the highest priority right now.”

Yeshiva University Prof. Rabbi Moshe Tendler, a medical ethicist, has taken a dim view of studies that focus only on Ashkenazi Jews. He has stated that genetic studies will reawaken the idea that “Jews carry genes that are polluting the world. That’s the basis of eugenics. If you have a ‘disease’ gene, don’t you owe it to society not to propagate that gene?”

The use of Jewish subjects in many genetic research studies may have added to anti-Semitic notions concerning mental illness in Jews, and some of those heinous ideas are expressed on anti-Jewish sites on the Web. For instance, a writer on Mid-East Realities (http://www.middleeast.org) claims that Dr. Arnold Hutschnecker (Richard Nixon’s longtime psychiatrist) believed that Jews are “carriers of schizophrenia” and display paranoia, aggressiveness, and racism.

Although concerns have been voiced about research studies leading to the stigmatizing of Jews, clearly there are tremendous benefits reaped from studies that are carefully designed and carried out. When scientists have access to research subjects and are able to scientifically test new drugs and other treatments, there are potential benefits to participants as well as to society as a whole. The underlying causes of schizophrenia will be understood only after careful study, data collection, analysis, and scrutiny in many different populations of affected individuals, including Jews.

 

More on: Schizophrenia research and the Jews

 
 
 

New clinical research study on schizophrenia

Sanofi-Aventis, a Malverne, Pa.-based pharmaceutical company, is enrolling subjects in a study of a new treatment to help schizophrenia patients improve cognitive functioning. Although a press release was sent to Jewish newspapers in this area, according to Brian Gaines, trial manager at Sanofi-Aventis, Jewish subjects are not specifically being recruited; the company is looking for any schizophrenia patients who are stable and relatively healthy. The drug, which is a new compound developed by his company, is thought to work by suppressing certain responses in the brain. It is designed to help patients who have cognitive impairment, that is, according to the press release, “people with schizophrenia [who] struggle to concentrate, remember, and learn.”

 
 
 
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Stay tuned for the return of comments

Ariel posted 12 Nov 2010 at 04:04 AM

November 12,2010

To whom it may concern:

My name is Ariel, I’m a native born San Diegan and I’m of Chinese descent. I’m 28 years old and I work in small family business for a retirement home. I’m a former schizophrenic and I have realized that I must write this letter to discuss that there

needs to be goverment regulations on giving out medications(drugs) to people suffering with Schizophrenia and Bipolar-disorder, and to the most extremes I don’t want people giving out medications to any mental disorder ( including dyslexia and

ADD). The mental doctors that I have discussed my problems with are working with a very traditional procedure that dates back to the 1960s and 70’s. The first time I met with these doctors they didn’t give me a proper analysis of my diagnosis. I’m

fully aware of the technology that is out there, they don’t use their technology to scan my brain and checked how the blood flows in there. I do know that is a very complicated task for them, but then again they never even taken a sample of my blood,

the only thing they have checked for was my weight. These doctors are not making the proper steps to someone with schizophrenia and bipolar. The basic procedure they use is:  the medical specialtist will read there doctoral books, the patient will

discuss their problem to them in a private room, the doctor takes no physical samples from them, and then they just find the best medication(drug) they think works best for them. The treatment is now a educated theory and it just doen’t work with

people. Here are some things that I would like to point out:

-American media is seriously against use of goverment drugs to people with mental disorders. Take a look at the movie ” One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest” starring Jack Nicholson, or the movie “Changeling” with Angelina Jolie, these movies have

an anti-medication theme to it. Lindsay Lohan is actual real life story, we all know this girl has experimented with drugs and alcohol. She was sent to rehab for it, and was given goverment drugs for it. When she was out of rehab, she eventually told

her mother she had stopped taking her meds. She and her mother had a verbal disagreement, and her mom called her a drug addict in public for not taking her meds. Lohan’s story is seriously the same scenario as many troubled youths all across the

country.

-I do think outside of my own box. The one issue that comes to my mind is the drug war in Mexico, this is having a major impact on society throughout their country, people are dying and it starting to effect the U.S. I do know that there are druglords

sneaking their stuff into the border states and many youths here are coming acrossing them, for many young patients this is were their war -in -the head begins. I feel the best we can do for ourselves is too clean ourselves up here at home and throw

these goverment drugs away.

-I see the problems within my own community, I have met enough people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. My friend down the street is suffering with bipolar disorder since his late teens, he’s the same age as me and we went to high school

together. He hasn’t worked in a very long time and he’s highly religious. He has never done street drugs. He’s spent enough time at a mental hospital and when he comes back to his parents house. His parents are not fully understanding what he’s

experiencing and they tell him to take his medications (drugs) for his own good or he’s kicked out. Once again, its the same scenario as Lindsay Lohan and her parents, the only difference between her and everybody else is that she has money to be

on her own. It is pointless to even hand out a medication when they just need time to clear out their mind.

I have talked to alot of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Some people talk about philosophy, they talk about the universe, some say they hear messages and see signs, and some are quite vague about their spirituality. When we narrow

it down, its obvious that we are all hearing about God. I wish I could be there in person to express my views fully. Please feel free to write me back.


                                                            Ariel                  

                                              Email - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Standardizing the Times

In which we announce and describe our new online partnership with the Times of Israel

The Jewish Standard is excited and pleased to announce our online partnership with the Times of Israel.

What does that mean to us, and to you?

It means that our hard copy version will stay as it is, but in the next two months or so our web presence will change entirely.

To explain, first we have to go backward.

Not really so very long ago, the world was so much more black and white.

Take newspapers. To begin with, they actually were black and white (and no matter what color your fingers were when you started to read, they’d be black by the time you were done. Ink didn’t stick on newsprint very well).

 

Vaccinate your kid!

Local Jewish leaders talk about their policies

Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav was a great grandson of the Baal Shem Tov; he was a chasidic master whose mysticism, extremism, creativity, asceticism, willfulness, and wild emotional swings from despair to ecstasy and then always back to despair make him an almost Byronic figure — had Byron, his contemporary, been a Jew from eastern Europe.

Nachman was thought to be so irreplaceable to his chasidim that they never did replace him; his spiritual descendants go to his grave in Uman, an otherwise obscure Russian town, around Rosh Hashanah every year, wearing their Na-Nach-Nachman-Me-Uman kippot as they brawl noisily around the town.

So why, you might wonder, is Nachman at the start of a story about vaccines?

 

Who stood at Sinai?

Conference to look at 25 years of Jewish feminism, examine what might come next

Every Jew who ever was and ever will be born stood together at Sinai when the mountain smoked and trembled and God revealed the law to them, midrash tells us.

Born Jews stood with those who were born into other faiths but were created with a Jewish spark that was liberated when they left their native people to join us. Souls encountered each other there, across millennia and over the boundless expanses of ocean that separate the continents.

At that one time and place, we were one people.

But wait a minute.

Exactly who was at Sinai?

According to the text, was everyone really there?

 

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Nor is standing in the middle of an ice-cold pond in a torn wetsuit and hand-selecting the most decorative available koi, at the orders of overseas hoteliers, again with your bare hands.

Jason Shames of Haworth did both those things, during a stay on an Israeli kibbutz. Those and similar skills, oddly enough, were part of a logical progression that took Mr. Shames from the Bronx to the helm of the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey, a job he accepted four years ago this week.

 

Hunting, hiding, finding — remembering

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Usually — or at least in common mythology, because in truth most of us have limited knowledge in this area — adventurers are amoral. They are men, or occasionally women, who are driven by adrenaline, the rush of danger, the need to go higher or faster or farther away.

And then there are the people moved by mission, by a sense of justice. The do-gooders. They are usually better people, but most likely less interesting — or so the same common mythology suggests.

Yaron Svoray, 58, the Israeli son of Holocaust survivors, is driven by the very basic need to have good conquer evil. Toward that end, he has infiltrated a group of neo- Nazis by pretending to be one of them. He has worked to recover treasures that the Nazis looted, not to enrich himself — he has not — but to pry the destroyers away from their bloodstained prizes. He is now devoting himself as well to working with police across Europe to keep terror from overcoming the continent once again.

 

Fifty shades of gold

Morgan Library showcases modern illuminated Jewish manuscripts by Barbara Wolff

Psalm 104 is about beauty.

It is about other things as well, true, but it starts with beauty and returns to it as a touchstone.

It describes the world with rapturous metaphor. God, who is “clothed with glory and majesty,” who covers himself with “light as with a garment, who stretches out the heavens like a curtain,” has made the world in his image.

When you walk into “Hebrew Illumination for Our Time: The Art of Barbara Wolff,” at the Morgan Library in Manhattan until May 3, you are surrounded by the wild precise beauty of that creation, in rich lush exquisite witty masterfully detailed controlled miniature.

To walk into that room is to be stunned by beauty.

 
 
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