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Teaneck students compete in International Bible Contest

 
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Two township boys, both congregants at Cong. Rinat Yisrael, took fourth and fifth place respectively in the International Chidon HaTanach (Bible Contest) at the Jerusalem Theater on Israel's Independence Day, April '4.


Yakir Forman, right, with his father, Etiel, after winning fourth place at the International Bible Contest in Jerusalem.

Yakir Forman, an eighth-grader at The Moriah School of Englewood, came in fourth place. Earlier that week, he had won the preliminary round for non-Israeli contestants.

Yosef Kornbluth, a sophomore at the Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy-Yeshiva University High School for Boys, placed fifth. He, too, is a graduate of Moriah.

"I don't recall, ever, an elementary school child doing that well," remarked Rabbi Neil Winkler, Moriah's longtime Bible Contest coach, upon hearing that Yakir had won the title of Chatan HaTefutzot ("bridegroom" of the Diaspora). "Thirteen is the cutoff age for the competition, and Yakir just turned 13 [in August]."

The three top winners were 17-year-old Israelis, one from Jerusalem and two from Be'er Sheva.

Yakir and Yosef had won free trips to the competition by virtue of their first-place finishes last May in the national round given in Hebrew — Yakir in the elementary school division and Yosef in the high school division. (A separate quiz is given for students competing in English.)

The International Bible Contest, founded by David Ben-Gurion and overseen by the Education Department of the World Zionist Organization, attracts young Bible scholars from across the world. This year, it included 64 participants from 35 countries, including three new ones to the competition — Peru, Colombia, and Macedonia.

Yakir, reached in Israel, said he'd been paired with contestants from Ohio, Panama, and Canada during the contestants' two-week stay. "I didn't expect to make so many friends here," he said.

Based on a written exam, the top scorer from each country gets to participate in the Diaspora round. The international final includes those with the top 16 grades among all contestants and includes the Israelis who almost always win the top spots.

Contestants had to know the entire books of Genesis, Judges, Samuel I and II, Kings I and II, Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Malachi, Song of Songs, and Ruth, and many parts of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Zechariah, Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Ezra, and Nehemiah.

Michael and Joanne Kornbluth and Lianne and Etiel Forman all flew to Israel to watch their children in the televised international final.

Etiel Forman described his feelings during the experience as "a mixture of intense anxiety, pride, and excitement." He could tell from the look on his son's face that he knew the answer to his first two-part question, on a section of Nehemiah.

So did he, because he'd studied a talmudic passage about that very section with Yakir more than a year ago, in preparation for Yakir's bar mitzvah. "I take the tiniest bit of credit for helping him with that one," said the proud father.

The Forman parents returned last week, while the Kornbluths and their children stayed on in Israel; attempts to reach them by press time were unsuccessful.

Before and after the competition, the contestants were treated to touring, hiking, and biking through the country, as well as meetings with dignitaries including the ministers of education and defense, the chief rabbi of the IDF, and Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who presented them each with a book of Psalms.

Lianne Forman said that Yakir, who will begin Torah Academy of Bergen County next year, kept to a strict study schedule following his national win. "He sat at the computer and made himself a timetable," she said. "He'd do his homework first and whatever time he had left, he would dedicate to studying. That meant giving up a certain amount of social life and some of his chess tournaments."

The payoff is a four-year full scholarship to the Jerusalem College of Technology (Machon Lev) for winning the Diaspora portion of the contest.

Yakir said he was grateful to Winkler and to his parents for encouraging him.

Many Moriah graduates have placed in the national and international Bible Quiz over the years, and Teaneck residents in particular have done well.

But it's relatively rare for two township residents to capture top-10 spots in the international round. Six years ago, Rebecca Koolyk and Chava Chaitovsky, then students at Ma'ayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls, placed sixth and eighth respectively. In '003, Nomi Presby, then a senior at Bruriah High School in Elizabeth, placed sixth, while Ashrei Bayewitz, a graduate of the Yeshiva University High School for Boys, placed ninth.

 
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A rabbi hasn’t walked into the bar ... yet

It’s not every day that a liquor license comes up for sale in Teaneck. (State licensing laws limit the number of licenses in a formula based on a town’s population.)

So when Jonathan Gellis heard that the owner of Vinny O’s in Teaneck was looking to sell the establishment, including the license, after 28 years behind the bar, he realized that only one of the more than 20 kosher restaurants in Teaneck could sell alcohol.

That seemed to be an opportunity.

Mr. Gellis is a stockbroker by day. He’s used to working in a regulated business — and the alcohol business in New Jersey is highly regulated.

Mr. Gellis grew up in Teaneck; his parents moved the family here from Brooklyn in 1975, back when the town had only one kosher restaurant. His four children attend Yeshivat Noam and the Frisch School, and he serves on the board of both institutions. He also is president of Congregation Keter Torah.

 

Paying it forward

Remembering Gabby Reuveni’s generous spirit

Just a glance at the web page created in memory of Gabby Reuveni of Paramus gives some indication of the number of people she touched and — through the ongoing efforts of her family — she continues to touch.

Killed two years ago in Pennsylvania by a driver who swerved onto the shoulder of the road, where she was running, Gabby, who was 20, was “an extremely aware and kind person,” her mother, Jacqueline Reuveni, said. “We’re continuing her legacy.”

The family has undertaken both public and private “acts of kindness,” she said, from endowing scholarships to meeting local families’ medical bills.

According to her father, Michael Reuveni, Gabby — then a student at Washington University in St. Louis and a member of the school’s track team — was a victim of vehicular homicide.

 

Where greatness lies

A memorial to Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

On July 3, 5 Tammuz, Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi died. He was 89.

He inspired tens of thousands of people directly — and indirectly he inspired millions more, people who have yet to discover that the spiritual approaches they hold dear were invented and graciously shared by him.

Reb Zalman was prodigiously influential over many decades, but he was not proportionately famous. He was not always given credit for his vast learning or for his astonishing array of contributions. And he was okay with that.

The first time I saw Reb Zalman, he was on the bimah of an auditorium that held 2,000 people. His face beamed love at the congregation. I had been leading another High Holiday service, and I was able to join his congregation for the last few minutes of Rosh Hashanah morning.

 

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Statements from the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades and the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office

A statement from the president and CEO of the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades

Today the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades learned that the Bergen County Prosecutor has filed charges against a former camp counselor. This counselor, who is a minor, was immediately suspended by the camp upon learning of the alleged incident. We continue to cooperate fully with the local authorities in their investigation.

 

A friend indeed

Intergenerational program at JCC enriches seniors, children

Watching the face of an elderly person surrounded by smiling 3-year-olds is “amazing,” says Judi Nahary. So amazing, in fact, that the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly has created a program specifically designed to multiply those interactions.

According to Ms. Nahary, director of the JCC’s senior adult services department, the joy such meetings bring both the seniors and the children explains the success of the center’s GranFriend program, which brings older visitors into the many classrooms of the JCC’s nursery program.

Working with Jo Sohinki, the director of the early childhood department — which serves some 300 youngsters — during the past year Ms. Nahary began matching members of her programs with nursery classes. Since then, GranFriends has taken on a life of its own, with increasing numbers of seniors eager to join the 10 now participating.

 

NCSY summer programs make adjustments

Despite missiles from Gaza, Orthodox Union Israel trips for teens provide fun, opportunities

“It’s gorgeous up here,” said Alisa Neugroschl, one of 550 North American teens taking part in eight summer programs in Israel sponsored by NCSY, the youth movement of the Orthodox Union.

The Bergenfield 16-year-old was speaking from the Upper Galilee, far from the Hamas rockets raining down on Israel’s southern and central regions. “They’re keeping us up north for safety reasons, and we’ve been doing touring and hiking,” she said.

Operation Protective Edge officially started just one day before the campers arrived in Israel on July 9, but the missile fire had been intensifying over the previous week. David Cutler, NCSY’s director of summer programs, saw that a fast and major overhaul of the programs’ carefully planned six-week itineraries was necessary. Certainly the teens would not be able to run a day camp in Sderot, as students have done other years, now that the Code Red sirens were blaring constantly there.

The Sderot kids did, in fact, have their NCSY fun day, but it was in Jerusalem rather than in Sderot. In cooperation with a social-welfare organization in the Gaza border town, a full bus of children came for the day.

 
 
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