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The race for Congress: Ninth District candidates on the issues

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach: ‘I am going to be the values voice’

 
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Rabbi Shmuley Boteach

1. Why vote for you?

Because I am going to be the values voice in Congress that shifts the national conversation away from distractions that have not helped the family, have failed to enhance our culture, and have not solved our economic malaise, in favor of a values renaissance that does. I’m going to tackle the insanely high divorce rate by making marital counseling tax deductible. I’m going to introduce legislation to create a national year of service so our students are in college three years, thereby lessening student debt and increasing altruism, sacrifice, and service. I am going to make the case for the strongest America-Israel relationship as I have on TV, radio, and in print for over two decades. I will bring universal Jewish values to the political discourse that allows us to move away from the social sexual obsession that has deeply divided America for more than a generation. Finally, I will enact financial policies that protect the needy, but give everyone the incentive to reclaim their dignity through self-sufficiency, independence, and self-reliance, and pay down the toxic national debt.

2 & 3. Iran

I have no confidence in the assurances of mullahs and Ahmadinejad who steal elections, deny the Holocaust, and slaughter their own people. The never-ending U.N. negotiations have done nothing but give Iran more time to build bombs. We have to draw a red line in the sand which gives Iran an imminent deadline by which they must open all of their nuclear facilities to U.N. and IAEA inspection, failing which they face assured military consequences. A nuclear Iran is a threat to world peace, with Israel and the United States their principal targets. President Barack Obama has said he is taking no options off the table. This must not be a bluff, lest American credibility be compromised.

4. Vouchers

Parents today who wish simply to give their children a values and/or religious-based education are penalized in the Ninth District with exorbitant property taxes and unaffordable tuition. This is serving as a natural contraceptive in the Jewish community where families are having fewer children because they can’t afford tuition fees. We are a community that relies fully on our birthrate for growth as we are a non-proselytizing faith. But beyond the Jewish community, all parents — and not just wealthy parents like the Obamas — have a right to choose the educational environment into which their children are immersed. Democratic politicians who are against school choice but who would never send their own children to public schools should be held to account. Vouchers are a must. I also believe that parochial schools, charter schools, and vouchers will not hurt, but enhance, public schools by making them more competitive and accountable. I also believe in bringing values-based courses to public schools so children are not only learning mathematics and geography, but those principles which made America great and are responsible for American altruism and exceptionalism.

5. How would you balance
the concerns of your Jewish
and your Muslim constituents
when they conflict?

At the University of Oxford, where I served as rabbi for 11 years, I brought together large numbers of Jewish and Muslim students from all over the world for lectures, debates, meals, educational seminars, and religious events. I did this while being a constant champion of Israel, and earned the Islamic students’ respect for the affirmation of my Jewish identity, just as I encouraged them to proudly affirm a peaceful Islamic identity. I believe that Judaism and Islam share a great deal in common, including theology, history, and values. The conflict between the Jewish community and Islam is with Islamic extremists and never the mainstream. I would resolve potential conflicts by reminding each community that we must always be true to our respective values, giving credit where it is due and criticism where it is warranted.

6. Annexing the west bank

I believe that any Israel-related initiative that takes the focus off Iran at this point is, however well-intentioned, distracting and misguided. Israel faces an existential threat from a nuclear Iran that has consistently committed publicly to Israel’s annihilation and extermination. This is not the time to discuss any substantial new initiatives that take the focus off Iran, something the hate-filled mullahs wish for. As for Israel’s ongoing negotiations with the Palestinians, Judaism is a religion that always promotes peace. But that presupposes a real negotiating partner that accepts your right to live, exist, and prosper. The continued inclusion of Hamas, a terrorist organization whose charter calls for the elimination of Israel, shows the lack of seriousness on the Palestinian side.

7. Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program

Of course the world’s richest nation must always provide a safety net for the needy — it is unacceptable that any American should go to bed hungry. But it’s equally unacceptable that the number of Americans relying on SNAP — a/k/a food stamps — has reached 50 million, including 14.2 million added during Obama’s three years in office. (See USA Today at http://usat.ly/L2xRCU for details.). All people want food, clothing, and shelter. But they also want dignity, which accrues through self-reliance and self-sufficiency. Government’s role is to incentivize people to become self-providing, which Maimonides says is the highest form of charity because it weans people off the indignity of charity. People want jobs rather than aid, the dignity of work as opposed to being wards of the state. Government should always assist those in difficult circumstances but it should seek to empower, rather than debilitate, its own citizenry.

8. Jewish issues

A. The economy and corrupt values that have led to financial decline.

B. Israel’s security and safety.

C. School vouchers and school choice.

9. Most important issues

A. The economy and corrupt values that have led to financial decline.

B. Jobs.

C. National debt, taxation, and government spending.

10. Partisanship

Partisanship is undermining our country because parties often look to score points rather than solve problems. I have spent my life bringing vastly disparate people together, regardless of economic background, religion, ethnicity, or way of life. I would do the same in politics by giving credit — whenever and wherever it is due, to political friend and foe alike — and offering respectful criticism where it is warranted, regardless of political affiliation. My values and principles will always come first.

 

More on: The race for Congress: Ninth District candidates on the issues

 
 
 

Blase Billack, Ph.D.: ‘We need true leaders in the Congress’

1. Why vote for you?

I am a lifetime Republican. I never switched my party for political gain. I am also a Ph.D. scientist and breast cancer expert. I argue that there are sufficient numbers of businessmen and women and lawyers already in the U.S. House.

2. Iran

NATO, the E.U., and the U.S.A. should boycott purchasing oil from Iran until that country stops developing nuclear weapons.

 
 

Rep. Steve Rothman: ‘I have worked closely with AIPAC’

1. Why you?

I am proud to have support from a wide range of voters in Bergen, Passaic, and Hudson counties, including the endorsement of NORPAC, Assemblyman Gary Shaer, and former Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes. Throughout my career in public service, I have worked closely with AIPAC and have always fought for a strong U.S.-Israel relationship.

As a member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense and the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State and Foreign Operations — the two subcommittees that allocate funds to joint U.S.-Israel military programs, and the billions of foreign aid to Israel — the security of the Jewish State of Israel is one of my top priorities.

 
 

Rep. William J. Pascrell: ‘I’m the fighter for the people’

Why you?

Voters need someone representing them who is honest and trustworthy. My opponent has run a campaign that has been anything but. Politifact NJ gave him a “Pants on Fire” rating for one of his campaign’s most egregious lies. But maybe the most offensive distortion his campaign has perpetuated is that I’m somehow not pro-Israel, despite the fact that me and my opponent have the exact same voting record on the subject. In fact, Steve Rothman vouched for my strong support for the Jewish state less than two years ago when a Tea Party Republican attempted to make the same claims. Assemblyman Gary Schaer upheld my support for Israel, too. What changed between now and then? Only the fact that he is running against me and is so desperate to keep his seat in Congress that he will say or do anything to get re-elected. I’ve grown up with both Jews and Muslims in Paterson, and I’ve represented both in Congress for many years. David Steiner, the former president of AIPAC, endorsed me by saying, “He’s 100 percent American through and through, and that’s why I’m supporting him.”

 
 

Our 10 questions for the candidates

On June 5, voters in the Ninth Congressional District will go to the polls to choose the Democratic and Republican congressional candidates who will vie for the House seat in November. The Jewish Standard posed a series of 10 questions and asked the candidates to respond. Aside from slight editing, the responses are their own, unfiltered by reporter or editor.

The two Democratic candidates, incumbents William J. Pascrell, Jr. and Steve Rothman, responded to our request. Two of the three Republican candidates — Blase Billack, Ph.D, and Rabbi Shmuley Boteach — also responded. Efforts to reach the third candidate, Dr. Hector Castillo, were unsuccessful.

 
 
 
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Not just blah-blah-blah and pizza

Mahwah shul develops programming for pre- and post-b’nai mitzvah kids

So now there’s a how-to-write-a-blessing class. “The parents are really appreciative,” Rabbi Mosbacher said.

“I used to meet with b’nai mitzvah kids and their families twice,” he added. “Now we meet seven times in the course of a year. The last one is right before the bar mitzvah. Now I’m thinking the last one should be after the bar mitzvah. It’s a lot of time on my part, but it’s time well spent in developing a relationship with the kids and with the families.”

While these efforts are designed to connect children and their families to the congregation before the bar or bat mitzvah, the synagogue also has changed its post-b’nai mitzvah connections to the children.

 

Reworded interdating rules sow confusion, controversy

United Synagogue Youth convention may have eased standard … or not

What’s in a name — or a word?

As it turns out, quite a lot. Take the word “refrain,” for example.

At its annual international convention in Atlanta this week, some 750 members of United Synagogue Youth voted to change some of the wording in the organization’s standards for international and regional leaders.

Most of the changes are clear, easily understood, and warmly welcomed. For example, the group added provisions relating to bullying and lashon hara — gossiping. Leaders should have “zero tolerance” for such behavior, the standards say.

 

French Jews face uncertain future

A look at some stories from a local leader

In the wake of the terror attacks at the Charlie Hebdo magazine office and the Hyper Cacher grocery store — a kosher market — I participated in a Jewish Agency mission to Paris.

Our delegation of Americans and Israelis arrived last week to show solidarity with the French Jewish community. We also sought to better understand the threat of heightened anti-Semitism in France (and, indirectly, elsewhere in Europe). We met with more than 40 French Jewish community leaders and activists, all of them open to sharing their concerns.

On January 7, Islamist terrorists murdered a dozen Charlie Hebdo staffers as retribution for the magazine’s cartoon depictions of the prophet Mohammed. Two days later, another terrorist held a bunch of Jewish grocery shoppers hostage, killing four, which French President Francois Hollande acknowledged as an “appalling anti-Semitic act.”

 

RECENTLYADDED

A school grows in Englewood

Moriah, first local Jewish day school, celebrates turning fifty

It was 1971, and Dr. Norman Sohn was finishing his training in Boston. He and his wife, Judith, were faced with a decision. Where would they go next? Where would they settle down?

As a newly fledged surgeon, the world was open to him. He could get a job almost anywhere. He was originally from Manhattan, and his wife was from New Rochelle, so the New York metropolitan area made sense to them.

They knew they wanted a yeshiva education for their children — Dr. Sohn had gone to the Rabbi Jacob Joseph School on Henry Street in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, a school that combined religious and secular studies in a way that was progressive for its time — and they also wanted the luxury of choice. They didn’t want a one-school city, as Hartford and even Boston were at the time. “What really attracted me was the multiplicity of neighborhoods that were hospitable to Orthodox people,” Dr. Sohn said. “But here there were so many that if one didn’t work out, there was another.”

 

Sounds of joy

Children’s choir ranked number one by congregation

Perhaps if Tzipporei Shalom’s music were to be reviewed by a professional critic, the word “wow” might not find its way into the finished product. But to the congregants of Congregation Beth Sholom in Teaneck — home to the children’s choir — the word seems just about right.

“It was the top-rated program in two synagogue surveys,” said Ronit Hanan, the shul’s musical director, who co-founded and co-directs the group with congregant Adina Avery-Grossman.

The a capella singing group has appeared with Safam, recorded a selection on a CD with the noted chazzan Netanel Hershtik, sung with Neil Sedaka, and joined with the synagogue’s adult choir, Tavim, on special occasions, most recently at CBS’s recent Shabbaton. They also participate in an annual community-wide junior choir festival together with choirs from local Reform congregations.

 

Affordable BRCA screening available for all Ashkenazi Jews

A new program at Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System in the Bronx is offering affordable genetic testing for the Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA cancer mutations.

Anyone who is of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, with at least one Ashkenazi Jewish grandparent, is eligible for the testing for a modest fee of $100.

For many years the recommendations to test for the gene were based on family or personal history of breast or ovarian cancer. But a research study recently revealed that in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, the risk of harboring BRCA cancer genes is high whether or not there is a family history of breast and ovarian cancer.

One in forty Ashkenazi Jews carry genetic glitches in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes that elevate the risk of breast and ovarian cancer to as high as 80 percent by the time they are 80 years old. In fact, the landmark study of randomly selected Ashkenazi Jewish men in Israel found that “51 percent of families…harboring BRCA1 or BRCA1 mutations had little or no history of relevant cancer.”

 
 
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