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Jews ponder the gubernatorial contest

Asking the hard questions

According to Roy Tanzman, president of the N.J. State Association of Jewish Federations, the group has approached the two candidates, urging them to address issues of concern to the Jewish community.

Tanzman outlined the issues in a piece circulated to Jewish newspapers, below.

Aging-in-place programs: The focus of services for seniors is concentrated on services to minority and Medicaid-eligible populations. However, a significant percentage of New Jersey’s seniors are aging in the suburbs, many with fixed or moderate incomes, but wanting to stay in their own homes.

How can New Jersey direct resources towards supporting underserved seniors so that they may age in place, including funding support for our surviving victims of the Holocaust?

Building capacity of non-profits: Non-profit organizations, such as our federations and affiliated agencies, are an essential part of maintaining a strong quality of life and a valuable component of the state’s economic engine. Non-profit organizations are facing extraordinary challenges stemming from the economic downturn and strict regulation.

How could the state ensure that non-profits have the resources and infrastructure needed to pursue their mission, such as legislation permitting participation in the state purchasing contract and approving tax incentives for charitable giving to non-profits, charities, and our non-public schools?

Senior transportation: Among the greatest needs for our elderly, transportation services remain at the top of the list so that they can access the programming, health care, socialization, and nutrition services that our elderly care agencies provide. However, the need has quickly outpaced our community revenue resources.

What strategies would the candidates suggest for additional accessible transportation services targeting suburban seniors?

Health-care reform: For the Jewish community, funding long-term services and support is vital. Medicaid reimbursement for medical services and nursing home care represents a large percentage of funding of services for the most vulnerable in our community.

How would the candidates propose that we reform health care nationally and statewide to best serve the vulnerable and to ensure that citizens have access to long-term health care support?

Homeland security: As residents of New Jersey, we are concerned with security concerns at our Jewish institutions and N.J. seaports, trains, airports, and chemical plants.

What steps would the candidates take to ensure that our state’s most vulnerable business and community centers are protected?

 
 

New head of umbrella group spells out its priorities

Ruth Cole, the new president of the State Association of Jewish Federations, sees “senior population issues” as among the most important facing New Jersey. And the association is marshaling its clout and allies to ease conditions for that population.

The Ridgewood resident cited the association’s support of the “aging-in-place program — we are urging the state of New Jersey to direct resources to serving underserved seniors so they can … continue to live as well as they can in their own homes, along with transportation so they can get to health care, nutrition services, and socialization. That would maintain their quality of life and avoid [their having to live in] nursing homes.”

The cost of maintaining people in their own homes, she noted, is about 10 percent of what it would be in nursing-home care.

For example, she said, “we try to further legislation that would amend the laws to include volunteer drivers’ efforts” for senior transportation.

“We are collaborators,” Cole said of the umbrella organization created by the state’s 12 Jewish federations. “We build teams of people” — professional and lay leaders of affiliated agencies — “with mutual interests” about “the public interest.” And then those leaders, either individually or as a group, advocate for needed funding and/or legislation.

“We really need to continue to help nonprofit agencies find funding in this very tight budget situation in this state,” she stressed. “If we weaken our nonprofit agencies, then the state would incur greater expenses in administering these services.”

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At the annual meeting July 8 of the State Association of Jewish Federations, Ruth Cole was installed as the umbrella organization’s president. She is flanked by Jacob Toporek, its executive director, and Roy Tanzman, its outgoing president. Rachel Toporek

Another high-priority item is boosting the New Jersey-Israel Commission. “The people in our leadership care about this,” she said. They are “very supportive of increasing the activities of the New Jersey-Israel Commission and its visibility and viability.”

The association has “a long history of promoting New Jersey as a premier location for Israeli companies. Our goal is to assist Israeli companies in making their move to New Jersey a successful one.”

This state, she pointed out, is Israel’s 12th-largest trading partner in the United States. “That translates into millions of dollars annually for the economy of New Jersey.”

Noting that Gov. Chris Christie had expressed a commitment to leading a trade mission to Israel, Cole said that the association offered its help to set up areas of interest and meetings for the mission, which would enhance the economic development of the state.”

Homeland security is also high on the association’s list of priorities. “The New Jersey-Israel Commission,” she noted, “was one of the major sponsors in June of ‘09 of a symposium on terror medicine, preparedness, and transportation systems, etc., that should be protected.” A similar symposium, focusing on local preparedness for terrorism and disaster, is set for Sept. 22 at Montclair University and is being coordinated, she noted, by her husband, Dr. Leonard Cole, an expert on bioterrorism. “At last year’s symposium,” she said, Gov. Jon Corzine was the honorary chair, “and we are anticipating that Gov. Christie will be the honorary chair” of the September symposium.

The state association also advocated for the state’s divestment from Iran, and as of March, according to Cole, “had divested more than 90 percent of its investment in companies [that do business with Iran] and are working with our Community Relations Councils and other community partners to now work for the ‘No Nuke for Iran’ initiative and ‘New Jersey Stop Iran Now.’”

Cole came to the SAJF as a member of the board of trustees of UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey, where she serves as chair of Partnership 2000 with the city of Nahariya in the Western Galilee. A past chair of the federation’s Jewish Community Relations Council and a past president of Jewish Family Service of Bergen County and North Hudson, she was also chair of leadership development for the federation. Her fellow officers have similar federation activities on the résumés. (Cole’s is also heavily weighted with Hadassah accomplishments, and she is the current national chair of Hadassah magazine.)

Another representative from UJA-NNJ, Susan Penn, is a member-at-large of the association.

Members-at-large, Cole explained, “represent the other executive board members of the state association and bring years of dedication and experience in community policymaking and advocacy.”

Penn, Cole continued, “is a very experienced knowledgeable leader on these issues, since she has been a chair of the CRC and along with myself and others is a leader in the Jewish Council for Public Affairs,” a community-relations councils and policy group umbrella organization. “She and I work with Joy Kurland,” director of UJA-NNJ’s Jewish Community Relations Council.

Asked how effective the association is, Cole said, “Very.” She noted that Stephen Sweeney, the president of the state Senate, had driven two hours from Gloucester to address the July 8 meeting, which had also been attended by the deputy consul general of Israel, Benjamin Krasna. “Having the top senator at our meeting,” she said, “indicates his respect for what we do.”

Meanwhile, “tough economic times require more advocacy and more education of our elected officials. You [have to] work with other bodies or you can’t be effective. It takes teamwork and working together to reach consensus and find a way to reach the goals — that programs that need to be supported are supported.” It helps, she said, that “the Jewish community leadership is strong, talented, experienced, and wise.”

 
 
 
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