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Rockland

New Reform Temple of Rockland set to emerge from two shuls

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Change can be frightening, but it often is necessary, and sometimes it can lead to great opportunity.

The demographics of Rockland County are changing. That is a clear truth. The Reform synagogues that flourished in the third quarter of the last century are struggling now. But instead of despairing, they are regrouping.

In January, Temple Beth Torah in Upper Nyack and Temple Beth El in Spring Valley, which are about a 15-minute car ride apart, agreed to merge. The new Reform Temple of Rockland will be the fruit of that new union.

“Temple Beth Torah was founded 50 years ago,” its president, Allen Fetterman of West Nyack, said. “It’s interesting that this is happening now.”

The synagogue’s membership peaked at about 400 families; now it has a still respectable 270. “But we realized a few years ago that the trend was going to continue, and we needed to look at some plans if we were going to continue,” Mr. Fetterman said. “About a year ago, Beth El came to that same realization — that they were facing having to close their doors if they didn’t do something.”

 
 

Rockland Jewish Family Service plans gala

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The Rockland Jewish Family Service’s annual gala will be held on Sunday, May 31, at 5:30 p.m. at the Comfort Inn, 425 East Route 59, Nanuet.

Retired judge Alfred J. Weiner, his wife, Renee, and Maria Dowling are the evening’s honorees. The Mary Ellen Sherz z’l Volunteer of the Year Award will be presented to Rachelle Rosenberg.

The dinner also will feature a silent auction and 50/50 raffle. For information and reservations, call (845) 354-2121, ext. 177, or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

 
 

Teenagers and sleep deprivation

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Teenagers don’t get enough sleep, and the consequences can be harmful, says Nyack Hospital sleep medicine specialist Dr. Anita Bhola.

Parents can help their teens understand the importance of good sleep habits, and how to carve out time from their busy schedules to get adequate rest, she says, noting that more information is available on the infographic at http://www.nyackhospital.org/teensleep.

“Teenagers are notorious ‘night owls,’ says Dr. Bhola, the mother of two teens. “No matter what time they need to get up in the morning, they stay up late doing homework, texting their friends or playing video games.”

Although sleep needs vary among individuals, in general teens ages 11 to 17 need about 8 ½ to 9 ½ hours of sleep a night in order to be alert, productive and healthy, she says.

Teens are more sleep-deprived than any other age group. Not getting enough sleep can affect a teenager’s ability to pay attention in school or consolidate the information they’ve learned into memory. Even staying up an extra hour a night can affect their performance on a test or their ability to function in school.

Teens who don’t get enough can become cranky. Sleep deprivation can also have more serious effects on behavior and mental health. “I see a lot of teens in my practice who have been referred to me because of impulsive behavior, anxiety and depression,” Dr. Bhola says. “A lot of those issues have to do with lack of sleep.”

One major factor in teens’ lack of adequate sleep is early start times at school. Sleep specialists around the country have been working with school districts to try to implement later opening times. Research has shown starting school a half-hour or hour later can improve school performance and decrease depression.

The use of electronics close to bedtime plays a large part in teens’ lack of sleep. The bright light from TVs, phones and laptops suppresses the production of the hormone melatonin in the body. Levels of melatonin start rising at night and induce sleep. Bright light sends a signal to the brain to suppress melatonin, and this causes problems with sleep.

“Over-scheduling also plays a role. Teens have so much homework and extracurricular activities,” Dr. Bhola says. She adds another reason teens stay up late is their biological clock, which changes around puberty. Their body won’t let them get to sleep early, and makes them want to sleep later. But since they have to get up early during the week, they end up compensating by sleeping until 11 or noon on the weekends.

Dr. Bhola suggests parents sit down with their teens and have a conversation about why it’s important to get enough sleep, and come up with a strategy the whole family can live with.

Get homework done by a certain time. Don’t eat a large meal within three to four hours of bedtime, and stay away from caffeine from late afternoon on. Incorporate daily physical activity, but not close to bedtime. Be consistent with weekday and weekend sleep/wake schedules. Shut off all electronics a half-hour before bedtime. Keep bedrooms dark, quiet and cool during sleep hours.

 
 

Club W to discuss ‘Defending Jacob’

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Club W, a discussion group for widows and widowers, will meet on Tuesday, March 31, at 7 p.m. at the offices of the Rockland Jewish Family Service, 450 West Nyack Road, West Nyack.

The group will discuss “Defending Jacob,” a novel by William Landay. The $10 group fee will be used to support bereavement services at Rockland Jewish Family Service. For reservations, call Carol King at (845) 354-2121, ext.142, or email her at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 
 

Nanuet Hebrew Center turns 75

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The Nanuet Hebrew Center will celebrate its 75th anniversary of history and service to the greater Rockland Jewish Community with a gala Journal Event and Brunch Reception on Sunday, April 12, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Rockleigh Country Club in Rockleigh, N.J.

The center will honor Linda Russin as recipient of the Stanley Blumenthal Community Service Award. To coincide with the brunch and celebration, a 75th anniversary ad journal will be prepared and presented. This electronic journal also will be displayed and available for download through NHC’s website and Facebook page.

Cost for the brunch reception is $65. For more information, to RSVP, or to place an ad in the journal, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or call (845) 708-9181.

Nanuet Hebrew Center is at 411 South Little Tor Road, just off exit 10 of the Palisades Parkway in New City. Visit NHC on the web at www.nanuethc.org and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nanuethc. For additional questions, contact Kari Warren at the center by calling (845) 708-9181 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

 
 
 
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New Reform Temple of Rockland set to emerge from two shuls

Change can be frightening, but it often is necessary, and sometimes it can lead to great opportunity.

The demographics of Rockland County are changing. That is a clear truth. The Reform synagogues that flourished in the third quarter of the last century are struggling now. But instead of despairing, they are regrouping.

In January, Temple Beth Torah in Upper Nyack and Temple Beth El in Spring Valley, which are about a 15-minute car ride apart, agreed to merge. The new Reform Temple of Rockland will be the fruit of that new union.

“Temple Beth Torah was founded 50 years ago,” its president, Allen Fetterman of West Nyack, said. “It’s interesting that this is happening now.”

The synagogue’s membership peaked at about 400 families; now it has a still respectable 270. “But we realized a few years ago that the trend was going to continue, and we needed to look at some plans if we were going to continue,” Mr. Fetterman said. “About a year ago, Beth El came to that same realization — that they were facing having to close their doors if they didn’t do something.”

 

Teenagers and sleep deprivation

 

Rockland Jewish Family Service plans gala

 

 

 
 
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