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School is back in session

 
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The man sitting on the commuter train focusing intently on his iPhone might be playing Angry Birds. Or he might be studying Talmud, Skyping with a chevruta partner in Israel, or even teaching Hebrew school.

“Mobile technologies could help people practice Judaism,” Barry Schwartz said. Schwartz is CEO of Rusty Brick, a West Nyack, N.Y.-based software company that has created more than 30 Jewish mobile apps. “It is the future. Wherever you go — the airport, shul — people are looking stuff up and praying.”

Welcome to Judaism’s digital age.

Mobile technologies are augmenting traditional learning and how people fill their free time, said Rabbi Jack Kalla of Aish HaTorah, which has been at the forefront of digital Jewish outreach with videos, podcasts, and an extensive website. Later this summer, the Orthodox organization will roll out its first mobile app, produced by RustyBrick, which will reproduce content from Aish’s website for mobile devices.

“From our perspective, the use of the Internet in trying to reach people who are searching or may not even have started their search in Judaism is really wide open,” Kalla said. “This is where people are, and the Internet itself is the means to reach people today.”

Jewish organizations across the spectrum are taking advantage of developing mobile and digital technologies to reach new people across multiple platforms. And all seem to agree: Get on board or get left behind.

“It’s not going to be the new model; it is the new model,” Rabbi Simcha Backman, director of Chabad’s Askmoses.com, said. “This is the new way and we should embrace it. Forward-thinking organizations are doing that.”

Created to reach people who don’t have access to rabbis, Askmoses offers live chats with scholars on its website, Backman said. Earlier this year the site began a text-messaging program. Later this summer, AskMoses will unveil its first mobile app, part of a larger strategy to continue reaching people wherever they are, according to Backman.

“Social media is literally a whole new world for Jews and Judaism,” he said. “The options are limitless how we can reach out to people.”

RustyBrick recently released the ArtScroll Schottenstein Talmud, in an app for the iPhone and iPad that will allow users to get instant translations, highlight specific passages, and quickly jump from one section to another. Pricing has not yet been set, but Rabbi Meir Zlotowitz, co-founder of ArtScroll, expects it to be a fraction of the cost of buying the entire 73-volume printed set.

“This opens up the whole world of Jewish literature for the past 2,000 years,” Zlotowitz said; it will put that world “literally at your fingertips.”

While such access already may have been available in schools, libraries, or private collections, Schwartz said that what’s innovative is what the technology allows users to do with the information. The data presented can change based on the user’s location, time of day or preference of Ashkenazi or Sephardi customs, he said.

“Enhancing the text around those criteria is the future of Jewish text learning,” he added. “When you’re able to actually interact with the words on the page, it’s going to change how people understand what they’re learning.”

Changing the way people learn is just what the Union for Reform Judaism is planning in its congregational Hebrew schools.

In August, URJ rolled out a digital format of its Mitkadem Hebrew school curriculum, which will allow students to communicate virtually with each other and their teachers. Students will work in small groups through each level of the curriculum, focusing on prayers, the meaning behind the prayers, and vocabulary while the teachers act as facilitators, testing at each level. This will allow students to work at their own pace in the classroom and work remotely with teachers outside of class, according to URJ’s head of books and music, Michael Goldberg.

“They relate to each other online on a regular basis anyway, but there’s something powerful about meeting virtually and in person,” Goldberg said.

In one pilot program, a student who plans to travel to Scotland with his parents next year will use Mitkadem to keep up with his Jewish studies back home. Goldberg said that students have reacted positively to the classroom innovations, and URJ hopes to expand the program eventually to every aspect of Jewish education.

Some catch-up might be necessary for educators, however. Teachers are the “digital immigrants” in the classroom, while students are the natives, said Wendy Light, director of integrated education in the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism’s education department. A little more than a year ago, with grants from the Partnership for Effective Learning and Innovative Education, the Conservative movement began a handful of pilot programs to train its educators in Web 2.0 technologies and how to incorporate them in the classroom. The training incorporates a number of free technologies, such as Googledocs, Skype, and Moodle.

“It’s going to replace the old paradigms in schools that are savvy enough to grab on and adapt the new technology,” Light said. “For some schools it will never catch on.”

While Goldberg predicts Mitkadem Digital eventually will replace its printed predecessor, brick-and-mortar congregational schools are unlikely to disappear.

“Synagogue communities are evolving in so many ways and undoubtedly education will continue to evolve with it,” he said. “There’s a place for online learning, but the experience of being physically together and having those personal connections one to one is very important.”

For Rabbi Steve Blane, who for many years was cantor at the Conservative Congregation Beth Israel of Northern Valley in Bergenfield, the Internet is the future of Jewish interaction and education. He is the founder and dean of the New York City-based Jewish Spiritual Leaders Institute, a completely online independent rabbinical school, now in its second year, that has students from around the world meeting in online chats and webinars. Each week, Blane will connect with his students over the Internet and teach traditional davening and praying, and then act as a moderator for discussions among the students.

“Students are required to lead their own sessions. This is not a teacher giving lectures,” he said. “JSLI is based on the idea that students have acquired wisdom. This nurtures everyone. They get credit for their past experience.”

JSLI ordained its first class of nine rabbis last August, including students in Florida, Seattle, and Israel. When students gathered together for the ordination weekend, it was the first time many of them had met face to face.

Blane also is the spiritual leader of Sim Shalom, an online synagogue that broadcasts weekly services to congregants who log on from around the world.

“As the technology gets more and more sophisticated, more and more doors open,” he said. “I had a gentleman who wanted to say Kaddish stuck in traffic.”

The advances allow Blane, who worked for years as a cantor in the Conservative movement, to reach Jews from all backgrounds. While he does not see the new paradigm completely displacing traditional venues, he does predict some attrition.

“It’s almost as if the structures we’ve created will supplement the Internet rather than the other way around,” he said. “Communities will live and breathe around the Internet and come together less frequently.”

With technology advancing at a rapid pace, just what Jewish education will look like in 20 years, or even in five years, is unclear, but the Jewish world appears ready for the challenge.

“All of these things are enabling us to realize our tradition and Judaism in ways that were simply unimaginable a few years ago,” said Backman of Askmoses. “I don’t know where it’s going.” But, he added, “It’s going to be phenomenal — and in a positive way.”

JTA Wire Service

 

More on: School is back in session

 
 
 

Learning online the Chabad way

What may be the largest program in online Jewish education is run out of Crown Heights, Brooklyn.

What started as a service for the children of far-flung Chabad-Lubavitch emissaries now enrolls 600 students. The original day-school equivalent programteaching Jewish subjects in Hebrew, Yiddish and Englishhas been supplemented with tracks for non-Chabadniks that also offer a one- or two-day-a-week Hebrew school experience and personal bar mitzvah tutoring for boys.

“We have students from all around the world,” said Rabbi Yossi Goldman, who runs the school at JewishOnlineSchool.com. “China, Kazakhstan, Germanyall around.”

 
 

With Ulpan-Or, local students gain fluency in Hebrew

Jewish day schools pack so many subjects into a long school day that Hebrew language instruction often is given a back seat. Teachers are always seeking ways to squeeze better conversational fluency out of limited classroom time.

With that goal in mind, Torah Academy of Bergen County hosted a four-hour June workshop, “High-Tech Hebrew,” run by the co-founders of Israel’s Ulpan-Or, attended by 30 educators and administrators from the Frisch School, Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls, the Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County, the Moriah School, Joseph Kushner Hebrew Academy in Livingston, and Westchester Hebrew High School.

 
 

Hebrew school goes ‘Ninja’

Five local shuls merge their afterschool programs

You’re going to Ninja school?

Wait. What?

Starting next month, children whose parents belong to five Conservative shuls across northern Bergen County will meet for Hebrew school at NNJJA, a mouthful of initials, standing for the Northern New Jersey Jewish Academy, pronounced as if it were a mutant green turtle expert in Japanese hand combat.

Cowabunga!

The school will meet at Temple Israel and Jewish Community Center of Ridgewood. It will run from kindergarten — which is not, properly speaking, Hebrew school at all — through seventh grade. The young children will meet on Sundays, and the older ones will get together on Wednesday afternoons as well.

 
 

Blended learning, lower tuition

Yeshivat He’Atid, a less expensive school, opens in Bergenfield

Yeshiva He’atid, which has been hailed as a solution to the high price of Jewish day school education, is opening in Bergenfield this week. It will have 118 students: 25 in the first grade, 43 in kindergarten, and 55 in pre-k.

It joins five other Modern Orthodox elementary day schools in the area.

What sets it apart is its tuition. Yeshiva He’Atid charges $8,990 for kindergarten and first grade, and charges none of the extra fees that can bring the costs at some schools up to $17,000. (Pre-k costs about $1,000 less.)

 
 
 
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Stay tuned for the return of comments

 

From Budapest to Woodcliff Lake

Rabbi Andre Ungar’s career crossed continents, spanned streams

Rabbi Andre Ungar, a courtly man with a spade-shaped beard and impeccable manners, speaks with what seems at first to be pure and crystalline Queen’s English, precise and beautiful.

Listen carefully, though, and you hear something else underneath, something somehow both more and less familiar.

It’s a Hungarian accent, giving depth and context to his speech.

Rabbi Ungar, rabbi emeritus of Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in Woodcliff Lake, is a complicated man, an intellectual with a well-earned passion for social justice and a life that took him to five countries in four continents before allowing him to settle here, in this one.

 

Blue and white moon

Israeli lunar mission makes stop in Paramus

In the May 1944, Itzhak Bash and 299 other Jewish engineers were removed from Auschwitz and taken to work at a Volkswagen factory that was assembling the V-1 flying bomb.

He had been a textile engineer in Hungary before the Nazis invaded and deported the Jews, but the Germans didn’t need his specific technical skills; they wanted slave laborers they could trust with careful work. The first V-1s from occupied France landed on London on June 13, 1944. As the Allies pushed into France, Mr. Bash was switched to work on the V-2, the first rocket to reach the edge of space. By the war’s end, more than 3,000 V-2 rockets had been launched.

Mr. Bash was one of the lucky hundred men who had survived from the original group of 300 engineers. Some were killed by Allied raids; others by the conditions at the work camps.

 

‘Come on over…’

As summer starts, we look at the Palisades Amusement Park through the eyes of its longtime publicist, Sol Abrams

“Palisades has the rides... Palisades has the fun... Come on over.

Shows and dancing are free... so’s the parking, so gee... Come on over.”

Suppose, just for a moment, that you might want to take an elephant water-skiing.

(No, don’t ask why. That’s a question for another time. Just go with it.)

Okay. So you’ve got the elephant. You’ve got a body of water big enough for it — the Hudson River.

Oh, and you happen to be on 30 acres that span Cliffside Park and Fort Lee, in southern Bergen County, not far at all from the river — but the direction to the river is less east than it is down. Straight down a jagged cliff. (It’s not called Cliffside Park for nothing.)

 

RECENTLYADDED

No light yet

‘Remember – she’s 2’

Although this community does not feel the barrage of rockets, the adrenaline and strain of IDF service, the upside-down-ness of life after a sudden recall to active service, the sleepless worry of parents, the responsibility of hundreds of innocent deaths on the other side, or the uncertainty of the outcome of the situation in Gaza, many of us have deep connections to Israelis, and even more of us want to help in any way we can.

Here are some stories of how this community – and remember that New Jersey is about the size of Israel – is reacting. These stories are just a few of very many, but we think that they are both representative and illustrative.

Please note that we have been careful not to include too much information in these stories. We have not said anything about where IDF members are serving, or what they are doing – or even given their names. We know that the IDF does not think it safe to publicize such information, and we comply with that request willingly.

 

No light yet

‘He meant to live his life’

Ilan Vakhnin, principal of the Shakim High School in Nahariya, is on the steering committee developing policy and programming for th Partnership 2Gether, a sister city relationship between the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey and Nahariya, a city in southern Israel.

He was part of a six-person delegation, in town for a few days of meetings, when his cell phone rang.

On the other end, his daughter was crying so hard that he had to tell her to stop it if he was going to be able to understand what she was telling him. Eventually, she was able to get the message out.

 

No light yet

‘Daddy, come home’

Rabbi Avram and Leah Herzog of Fair Lawn are the aunt and uncle of two nephews who live in Israel. They are the sons of Rabbi Herzog’s sister, Zehavah Bigman, who made aliyah with her husband, Joel, more than 30 years ago.

Both of the nephews have completed their IDF service. Both are married; the older one at 32, has four children, and the younger one, 26, has a baby.

Both, like most Israeli men their age, are in the reserves.

 
 
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