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Orthodox alumni mark Princeton milestone

Yavneh House, haven for camaraderie and kosher meals, turns 50

 
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Rabbi Daniel Greer (class of ’60) shares his experiences as one of the first Orthodox Jews to attend Princeton at the Yavneh 50th anniversary celebration. Photos by Bina Peltz

More than 100 Princeton University alumni and current students gathered on Feb. 12 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Yavneh House, the university’s Orthodox Jewish student organization.

Participants in the daylong celebration reminisced about the challenges of forming a Yavneh chapter at Princeton in the early 1960s, at a time when a “silent quota” on Jews was easing at the Ivy Leagues.

And they celebrated the efforts to launch a Princeton chapter of Yavneh National Religious Students Association, to provide kosher food, Torah studies, prayer services, and social opportunities.

Rabbi Daniel Greer, who now heads the Yeshiva of New Haven in Connecticut, was one of the first Orthodox Jews to enroll at Princeton as an undergraduate in 1956. In a panel titled “Yavneh: From Hippies to iPhones,” Greer discussed his struggle to maintain his observant lifestyle on a campus made up of only 8 percent Jews, many of whom he described as “closet Jews.”

Even the Hillel rabbi who served as chaplain at the time masked his Jewishness by concealing the mezuza in his office and opting for the title of “Mr.” rather than “Rabbi” on his nameplate, Greer told NJJN, echoing recollections of many of the alumni present.

“The Hillel rabbi told me that after three days on campus I would be eating t’reif,” said Greer. “I was the second Jewish student to go through the school and keep kosher. Many students came there kosher but didn’t finish that way.”

At Princeton, Greer wore the same Ivy League “Joe College uniform” as his peers — “tan chinos with a buckle in the back, a blue Oxford shirt, and a heather-green Shetland sweater,” he told the audience in the multipurpose room of the Frist Student Center.

But unlike Greer’s peers who gathered in the social clubs, mealtimes were spent in his room, where he heated up food his mother packed when he went home to New York City for each Shabbat. He often shared meals with another observant student, Abe Kaufman, who became Yavneh’s first president.

“The main issue as an Orthodox student at Princeton was the loneliness, which was almost palpable,” Greer recalled. “I got the physical and academic sustenance, but I was sorely lacking in emotional sustenance.”

Kaufman, a resident of Queens, also addressed the audience. “I was totally out of my element in the WASPy social scene of Princeton,” he said. “Outside of New York, words like kosher, chutzpah, and mazel were unknown. Being Jewish was like an inside joke. The idea of starting a kosher eatery there was unheard of.”

The creation of Yavneh and its kosher dining facility slowly began to change the face of Judaism on campus, said Dr. Rivkah Blau of New York City, in her opening remarks prior to the first panel.

Blau, a graduate of Barnard and Columbia, was one of the founders of Yavneh National Religious Students Association. She recalled how her father, the late Rabbi Mordechai Pinchas Teitz of the Jewish Educational Center in Elizabeth, heard about the difficulties Greer and Kaufman were facing. He called Milton Levy, owner of Levy Brothers, the former Elizabeth department store. Levy himself had undergone similar difficulties as a student at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1920s.

“He told me to consult with my mother and make a list of everything that would be necessary for a kosher home and to bring the list to his store,” said Blau, who teaches English at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck. “When I came to his office, he handed me his charge card and told me to buy everything on the list. My father provided siddurim and a sefer Torah.”

Yavneh first met at a rental home on Olden Street, later moving to Wiggins Street. In 1971 a kosher dining hall was formed on campus in Stevenson Hall. In 1993 Yavneh moved to the university’s Center for Jewish Life/Hillel.

Today, Yavneh offers kosher food, daily prayer services, student-led study sessions, and Talmud classes taught by Blau’s husband, Rabbi Yosef Blau, director of religious guidance at Yeshiva University, and her brother, JEC dean Rabbi Elazar Mayer Teitz.

Jews currently make up 13 percent of Princeton’s 5,000 undergraduates. Among them is Avital Hazony, a senior from Jerusalem who organized Yavneh’s anniversary event. Hazony’s parents met through Yavneh, and married in Princeton, where Hazony was born.

“Today we are showing our deepest gratitude to alumni who made Yavneh what it is today, enabling us to live and learn here the way we do now,” Hazony said in the opening remarks. “It used to be very hard to be Jewish and observant at Princeton. People don’t realize what opportunities for Jewish students there are here now.”

For alumna Suzanne Last Stone of New York City, if it weren’t for Yavneh, her Orthodox parents would not have allowed her to enroll at Princeton. A professor of Jewish law at Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law, Last Stone was a member of the second class of women admitted to Princeton in 1970.

“Princeton was the forming ground for my professional life. It allowed me free rein to study Judaic studies and take my senior year at Hebrew University,” she said. “It gave me the sense that Jewish texts and ideas were enormously valued for public intellectual life.”

Highland Park resident Barry Levinson, who graduated in 1977, said he enjoyed reminiscing with Yavneh friends at the anniversary.

“I was a ‘Conservadox’ Jew on the path to becoming Orthodox, so it was very important to me to have a Jewish community,” Levinson told NJJN. “It was transparent that one could be an Orthodox Jew and be welcome at an Ivy League college.”

Panelist Marilyn Berger Schlachter, a child therapist from University Hills, Ohio, described her Princeton years as transformational. She was among the first class of 90 women admitted to the school in 1969 and was there when the kosher dining hall opened.

“It was very exciting to be there at that time and to help build the Orthodox community,” she said. “Princeton has certainly transformed from a few Jewish students eating in their rooms to a full-fledged Orthodox community.”

The New Jersey Jewish News

Jill Garbi is a contributing writer to The New Jersey Jewish News

 
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Stay tuned for the return of comments

Rivkah Teitz Blau posted 19 Feb 2012 at 09:05 AM

In Jill Garbi’s excellent account of the celebration of 50 years of kosher dining at Princeton, please note one correction:  Rabbi Yosef Blau and Rabbi Elazar M. Teitz taught Talmud there in the 1960s and ‘70s; today the JLI couple, Sara and Rabbi David Wolkenfeld, and the students arrange classes.

 

What did he know? When did he know it?

State Senate majority leader Loretta Weinberg discusses GWB scandal interim report

On Monday, the New Jersey state legislative committee investigating Bridgegate submitted an interim report.

Anyone expecting a final answer to the question of what did he know and when did he know it — or to be more specific, how much did Governor Chris Christie know about the closure of the three local lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge, creating potentially lethal havoc in Fort Lee, and when did he learn that his aides had been responsible for it — would be disappointed.

Still, there are nuggets there about the scandal, lying ready for gleaning.

This is very much an interim report, Loretta Weinberg stressed. Ms. Weinberg, a Democrat, is the state Senate’s majority leader. She lives in Teaneck, and Fort Lee is in her district.

 

Reworded interdating rules sow confusion, controversy

United Synagogue Youth convention may have eased standard … or not

What’s in a name — or a word?

As it turns out, quite a lot. Take the word “refrain,” for example.

At its annual international convention in Atlanta this week, some 750 members of United Synagogue Youth voted to change some of the wording in the organization’s standards for international and regional leaders.

Most of the changes are clear, easily understood, and warmly welcomed. For example, the group added provisions relating to bullying and lashon hara — gossiping. Leaders should have “zero tolerance” for such behavior, the standards say.

 

Not just blah-blah-blah and pizza

Mahwah shul develops programming for pre- and post-b’nai mitzvah kids

So now there’s a how-to-write-a-blessing class. “The parents are really appreciative,” Rabbi Mosbacher said.

“I used to meet with b’nai mitzvah kids and their families twice,” he added. “Now we meet seven times in the course of a year. The last one is right before the bar mitzvah. Now I’m thinking the last one should be after the bar mitzvah. It’s a lot of time on my part, but it’s time well spent in developing a relationship with the kids and with the families.”

While these efforts are designed to connect children and their families to the congregation before the bar or bat mitzvah, the synagogue also has changed its post-b’nai mitzvah connections to the children.

 

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High tech, human passion, Israeli lifesaving

Minutes matter. When it comes to saving lives, even seconds matter.

When they face a medical emergency, people call 911, and an ambulance is dispatched immediately. That system indisputably saves lives. But the EMT technicians inside those ambulances must negotiate snarled traffic, dangerous intersections, careless pedestrians, callous drivers, and other road hazards. Valuable minutes are lost.

What to do?

In Jersey City, Mayor Steven Fulop has a solution — and it comes straight from Israel.

The city is joining forces with United Hatzalah and the Jersey City Medical Center — Barnabas Health to form Community Based Emergency Care. That is a bland name for a clever new program aimed at bridging the gap between the time that an emergency is called in and when the cavalry — the EMTs and their ambulance full of equipment — can show up. It will use a combination of human passion and goodwill and technology to meet that goal.

 

Don’t bogart that joint — at least not on Shabbat

Fair Lawn’s Shomrei Torah’s study session looks at medical ethics, medicinal cannabis, and other issues

Just because 22 states have legalized medical marijuana, does that make it completely kosher in the eyes of Jewish law?

This timely topic will be one of the issues explored during “Torah, Text, and Tradition: An Evening of Learning and Sharing,” set to take place from 7 to 9:45 p.m. on January 31 at Fair Lawn’s Congregation Shomrei Torah, 19-10 Morlot Avenue.

Nine members of the Orthodox congregation are offering lectures grouped into three time slots. There are three choices in each slot, providing a smorgasbord of options free of charge to men, women, and teenagers from the greater community.

The idea for the evening came from Rabbi Dr. Wallace Greene, a retired Jewish educator and communal leader who joined Shomrei Torah in 1971. He will present “Medical Marijuana in Halakha,” a subject he has been writing and speaking about for the last two years as part of his greater interest in Jewish bioethics.

 

An American rabbi in Paris

NYU’s Rabbi Yehuda Sarna talks about France to local shuls

Two weeks ago, when four Jews were killed in a terrorist attack at a kosher supermarket in Paris, Rabbi Yehuda Sarna decided to go to Paris to visit and comfort the community

Rabbi Sarna leads the Bronfman Center for Jewish Life at New York University — the school’s equivalent of a Hillel chapter.

As a native of Montreal, he speaks French. And as a disciple and former intern of Rabbi Avi Weiss, his reaction to a crisis is: “When you feel a personal connection and likely nobody else will be there, just go.”

So two weeks ago, shortly before Shabbat, he posted plans to go to Paris on his Facebook page. Within half an hour, he had found a group of people interested in going with him.

 
 
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