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Hakoah back in play — after 73 years

Local soccer team revives historic Viennese sport club

 
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Sport Club Hakoah of Bergen County trounced its opponents in its most recent outing. The team’s name memorializes the famed Austrian national championship team of 1925-26, forced off the field for good by the Nazis in 1938. Courtesy Ron Glickman

On a recent Sunday night, with darkness all around, a rectangle of bright light illuminated a soccer field, and a small bit of Jewish sports history was replayed as Sport Club Hakoah of Bergen County trounced its opponents, 6-2.

The victory, at the Fairleigh Dickinson University field in Teaneck, was the second in a row for Hakoah, showing that the new team was beginning to gel, said its general manager, Ron Glickman.

More important, the new team honored its namesake, Sport Club Hakoah Wien, which formed in 1909 to give Jewish men in Vienna the chance to participate in high-level sports. The team was Austrian national champion in 1925-26.

The Bergen team is the brainchild of Glickman, who shares managerial and playing duties with his brother, Dov.

The Vienna team built a solid record of wins, taking their league in the 1919-20 season. As the team’s history notes, success brought an invitation to an exhibition series with West Ham of England.

Before a crowd of 40,000, Hakoah battled to a 1-1 draw with West Ham in their home game. Then, in England, it beat Ham 5-1, said to be the first time a foreign club defeated an English team on English soil.

Two seasons later, Hakoah fought its way to the Austrian championship. In a dramatic final game, the goalie, Alexander Fabian, injured a shoulder with the score at 2-2. With his arm in a sling but his legs working fine, he switched to offense, booted a weak shot that deflected off a defender, and scored the winning goal.

A Hakoah tour of the United States in 1926 included a game in the Polo Grounds in Manhattan (it was then the home of both New York Giants teams —baseball and football) before a crowd of 46,000. Warmed by Jewish fans in New York and less anti-Semitism than in Europe, many players signed up with U.S. clubs, taking a toll on Hakoah’s roster. Nazi oppression ended the original team in 1938.

For Glickman, 28, continuing the Hakoah legacy was a dream since he was 17, he said, when he visited the Diaspora Museum in Israel with his father. His great-grandfather saw the original Hakoah play in the Polo Grounds all those decades ago. “I was a soccer fanatic, but I didn’t know our people had such a big part in it,” he said.

Two years ago, Glickman canvassed college team rosters for potential players, contacted friends from Teaneck High School, where he was on the soccer team, and posted flyers in various towns.

The team came together this year and now stands at 20 registered players, he said. The rebuilt Hakoah club competes in the North Jersey Soccer League, which is accredited by the United States Soccer Association. Most of the players are Jewish, said Glickman, coming from Teaneck, Tenafly, Closter, Union City, South Orange, and New York.

The team jersey displays a Star of David and the words SC Hakoah. The SC stands for sport club, and Glickman noted that the original club encompassed several sports, notably swimming, and he hopes the Bergen club will, too.

Speaking of last Sunday’s victory over Emerald, which followed a victory in the game before, Glickman said “it was long overdue.” The players, in their first season, are beginning to click as a team, and “nobody wants to lose momentum,” he said. The team record for the season to date is three wins and four losses.

Although the team has a strong Jewish identity, it also has a multinational flavor. At the game on the FDU field, cheers rang out as Saeed Suleman-Baba, born in Ghana but raised in Saudi Arabia, scored for Hakoah. He was assisted by Mathieu Gouverneur of France.

Asked if the fact that a Muslim who hails from Saudi Arabia is playing for a Jewish team raises any eyebrows, Suleman-Baba said no. “Nothing wrong with that, it’s soccer,” he said.

“We really are a melting pot,” Glickman said, noting languages spoken by team members include Russian, Arabic, Norwegian, Spanish, French, Swedish, and, of course, Hebrew and English. Glickman also speaks Hebrew, learning from his U.S.-born parents and having served in the Israeli army after high school.

One of the Hebrew speakers is Ofir Singal, an Israeli who played in Jerusalem for the professional team Hapoel. “It’s great to play on a Jewish team, with great guys. It’s fun,” he said.

Singal is 45 but says he has no trouble keeping up with the younger players. “I run all the time,” he said. “It’s no problem at all.”

For the players, soccer transcends ethnic boundaries, and for Bergen Hakoah, Jews, Christians, and Muslims play together for the common goal, to win games, said Narel Nahar of Tenafly, team captain.

“It’s a great opportunity to show the community that many religions can play together as one team,” said Nahar, who played professionally in Israel. “As a Jew and an Israeli, it’s very emotional to be able to represent the Jewish community in Bergen County,” he said.

Jonah Silk, 26, found playing for Hakoah a meaningful Jewish experience. “Initially, I missed playing soccer,” said Silk, who played for his alma mater Drew University.

“As I learned more, it fueled a desire to get in touch with my Jewish roots. It became far more significant,” said the South Orange resident. “It feels like you’re part of something special.”

The team relies on sponsors, including El Al, Always Travel of Paramus, and Data Life, a software company.

The next game is scheduled for this Sunday against Real Wyckoff, in Wyckoff. [Visit bergenhakoah.com, www.facebook.com/bergenhakoah, or on Twitter at @bergenhakoah for details.]

 
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Pruzansky vs. Matanky

Rabbi’s Nazi analogy draws fire

The president of the Rabbinical Council of American, Rabbi Leonard Matanky, has weighed in on the ongoing dispute between Rabbi Steven Pruzansky of Congregation Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck and Gary Rosenblatt of Teaneck, editor and publisher of New York’s Jewish Week.

“I am pained that I have to distance myself from a colleague, but the kind of language that Rabbi Pruzansky used is unacceptable and crosses the line of decency and discourse,” Rabbi Matanky is quoted in the Jewish Week as having written. (Rabbi Matanky lives in Chicago’s West Rogers Park neighborhood — which is more or less the Teaneck of the Midwest — where he is rabbi of Congregations K.I.N.S. and dean of the Ida Crown Jewish Academy.)

 

What did he know? When did he know it?

State Senate majority leader Loretta Weinberg discusses GWB scandal interim report

On Monday, the New Jersey state legislative committee investigating Bridgegate submitted an interim report.

Anyone expecting a final answer to the question of what did he know and when did he know it — or to be more specific, how much did Governor Chris Christie know about the closure of the three local lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge, creating potentially lethal havoc in Fort Lee, and when did he learn that his aides had been responsible for it — would be disappointed.

Still, there are nuggets there about the scandal, lying ready for gleaning.

This is very much an interim report, Loretta Weinberg stressed. Ms. Weinberg, a Democrat, is the state Senate’s majority leader. She lives in Teaneck, and Fort Lee is in her district.

 

Reality check

Author to discuss intergenerational ‘experiment’

Katie Hafner began her professional career writing for a small newspaper in Lake Tahoe.

That didn’t last for long, though. “I worked my way up,” said Ms. Hafner, who now writes on health care for the New York Times.

A seasoned journalist, Ms. Hafner was exceptionally well prepared to chronicle an experience in her own life that she calls both an “experiment in intergenerational living” and a “disaster.” Inviting her 77-year-old mother to live with her and her teenage daughter, Zoe, in San Francisco, Ms. Hafner learned that fairy-tale imaginings are no match for emotional truths.

(In her book, Ms. Hafner calls her mother Helen. That is not her real name; her mother requested anonymity, and Ms. Hafner honored the request.)

 

RECENTLYADDED

Norpac hosts fundraiser for Huckabee

Norpac’s president Dr. Ben Chouake weighs in on the state of the U.S.-Israel relationship
It’s hard to sign on to social media these days without seeing a right-wing news article decrying President Obama’s relationship with Israel. Despite a plethora of stories of how the president is abandoning Israel, “the current status of the U.S.-Israel relationship is very strong,” Dr. Ben Chouake, Norpac’s president, said.
 

David Zvi and Josh’s excellent bentscher adventure

How two friends came to craft Seder Oneg Shabbos, a book of Grace and beauty

Much of our aesthetic today is reflected in Apple.

It’s clean, sleek, and spare. It understands the elegance of white space and the rapture of restraint. It implies but does not promise. It does not hector, it does not natter at us.

It is cool, and it also is cold.

So maybe you’re finishing Shabbat dinner. It’s winter outside but warm in the dining room, full of family and friends and wine and challah and chocolate and song. Or maybe it’s a wedding of good friends, and you’ve eaten well if not wisely, and danced every calorie away.

It’s time to bentsh, to say the Birchat Hamazon — the long blessings after a meal that observant Jews often say to themselves quickly after ordinary meals but might sing loudly together at the end of more festive ones.

 

Norpac hosts fundraiser for Huckabee

The dust is still settling from the 2014 midterm elections, but the race to 2016 is already on. Potential presidential candidates already have started lining up donors.

Norpac, the North Jersey pro-Israel political action committee, regularly holds fundraisers for incumbents. When there is no incumbent, as there will not be in the presidential race in 2016, it raises funds for candidates who have strong records on Israel. On Saturday night, the Englewood-based group held a fundraiser that drew about 35 people and collected at least $40,000 for Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor and one-time Republican presidential hopeful who now is a commentator on Fox News.

But — Mr. Huckabee hasn’t declared himself a candidate for 2016 yet, so the fundraiser officially was for Mr. Huckabee’s 501(c)4 non-profit, America Takes Action.

Many candidates have issue-related organizations, such as Bill Clinton’s Clinton Global Initiative. Fundraising events for such organizations don’t contribute directly to a political campaign. They do allow the candidate to send a message about which issues are important to him or her, however, and they create opportunities for Norpac’s members to gain access to the potential candidate.

 
 
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