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‘America deserves better’: A call for health-care reform

 
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Providing quality, universal health care as a core societal obligation is a 2,000-year old command in the Jewish tradition. It speaks across millennia to us today. Consider the words of the Jewish tradition on health care:

• “Whoever is in pain, lead him to the physician.” (Baba Kamma 46B)

• “It is obligatory from the Torah for the physician to heal the sick and this is included in the explanation of the phrase and you shall restore it to him, meaning to heal the body.” (Moses Maimonides)

• “God created food and water; we must use them in staving off hunger and thirst. God created drugs and compounds and gave us the intelligence necessary to discover their medicinal properties; we must use them in warding off illness and disease.” (Moses Maimonides)

• “No disciple of the wise may live in a city that is not provided with the following 10 officials and institutions: [the first two being] a physician and a surgeon, [a bath-house, a lavatory, a source of water supply such as a stream or a spring, a synagogue, a school teacher, a scribe, a treasurer of charity funds for the poor, a court that has authority to punish with stripes and imprisonment].” (Moses Maimonides)

• “Our Rabbis taught: the non-Jewish poor are to be sustained along with the Jewish poor, the non-Jewish sick are to be visited along with the Jewish sick … for the sake of the ways of peace.” (Gittin 61a).

Indeed, the very word “shalom” comes from the root “l’shalem” — to make whole, to heal. People of faith have always understood our responsibilities to include the obligation to bring health to all, and healing to the sick and infirm. With optimism and determination, we are on the cusp of fundamentally changing the way that Americans ensure health care to all.

To those who would say that religion has no place in the health-care reform debate — that this has become too much a partisan political issue — organizations representing a broad consensus in the mainstream religious communities insist that this is a quintessentially religious issue. The health-care crisis touches nearly every citizen, every community, every church, mosque, temple, and synagogue; every member of the clergy and every congregant. The failure to provide universal health-care coverage challenges the simplest and clearest biblical command expressed by Ezekiel, that “[e]very living thing shall be healed.” It is these values and these concerns that bring the religious community here to say: America deserves better than the reality.

What is the reality?

“We live in a country with a pitifully inadequate health-insurance system that causes horrors every day so tragic that they could rip the heart out of a stone.... The time has long since passed when our leaders should have done what every other advanced country has somehow managed to do: provide all its citizens with essential health care.”

With these words, Rabbi Eric Yoffie, president of our Union for Reform Judaism, called on all of our synagogues to join the struggle to pass universal, affordable, accessible, and portable health-care reform.

The moral test of health-care reform is whether it provides accessible, affordable, quality health insurance for all, including our country’s low-income seniors, children, the disabled, and immigrants. These are the people most at risk of falling through the cracks, and these are the people who rely on us to ensure that they can find decent health care when they need it. Indeed all Americans, wealthy and poor, children, the elderly, and, yes, women, deserve care that meets all their needs — including reproductive health needs — and keeps them healthy throughout their lives.

Yes, America deserves better than the reality.

For the 10 million uninsured children, we say: America deserves better! For the millions of the disabled whose health care is threatened, we say: America deserves better! For the more than 80 million who at some point this year will lose health insurance, we say: America deserves better! For those millions of hard-working Americans who have lost jobs and with them their health benefits, we say: America deserves better! For all of those tens of millions of Americans who fear that they may lose their access to comprehensive coverage, and whose life savings are threatened by catastrophic illness, we say: America deserves better! For the soul of our nation, we say: America deserves better.

Our traditions demand better. Our nation seeks better. God’s children deserve better. This Congress can do better. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call of the fierce urgency of now should animate the decisions each senator will make in ensuring universal health coverage. We pray and advocate that they will do better — for all Americans and for our nation’s future.

Rabbi David Saperstein is director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism. This piece is adapted from remarks he delivered at a press conference on Monday at the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Other speakers were Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.); Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich); James Winkler, General Secretary, United Methodist Church; and Sister Simone Campbell, Executive Director, NETWORK, a national Catholic social justice lobby. Other religious leaders stood behind the speakers, representing various denominations supportive of health-care reform.
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Stay tuned for the return of comments

Aryeh Lewis posted 18 Dec 2009 at 05:27 AM

I agree with the Rabbi here ... BUT   Obamacare is NOT about health care reform ... it is about health care deprivation/deformation ... it will worsen health care for everyone and still not cover everyone ... it will bankrupt our economy, contrary to what the President in his ideologically driven zeal says… stop repeating the deception ... do not play on true compassion and Jewish liberal standards to lead us into this trap!

HARRY posted 20 Dec 2009 at 09:02 PM

Last week, Rabbi Waskow misused the Jewish religion to promote his politics re climate change.  This week, it is Rabbi Saperstein’s turn to misuse the Jewish religion to promote his politics re health care. 
I have no problem with clergymen expressing their political beliefs.  I do have a big problem with clergymen expressing their political beliefs as religion based.  Then, why is there so much disagreement among the clergy regarding politics?  We have seen the clergy promote evil deeds as well as good deeds. 
The clergy should stick to their business.  Teach the laity religion and religious behavior.  Let us interpret how our religion should affect our politics.

KRG posted 22 Dec 2009 at 10:30 PM

You’re still free to interpret how religion should affect your politics - however you want. But so are they! Do with it what you will.

Cynthia Lowenkamp posted 25 Dec 2009 at 06:47 PM

It is a shame for the Rabbi to conclude that what is needed is universal healthcare according to Baba Kamma.  What specifically is wrong with the American healtcare system?  Where is the list of legitimate problems?  When will we study them, and if needed, then resolve them?
I have written to my legislators and the only response I have gotten is “Thank you for your response.”  The Halachah tell us that the most important factors in life are the individual and the community.  In my opinion, neither the current administration nor the Rabbi have fully performed their due diligence in this respect.  The Rabbi’s statements are uninformed at best and political, it seems, which is the worst.  Further, it appears that the current administration is unable to truly care about much of anything and that its actions are also uninformed and political only, both of which are the worst,  especially when governing.  But the real question is what can be done about any necessary improvements to our healthcare system that may be needed in an affordable way, and in a way in which the government does not take over the system?

Moshe posted 26 Dec 2009 at 10:17 PM

Rabbi Saperstein fails to differentiate between access to healthcare and affordable healthcare insurance.  It is true that everyone in the US (including non citizens) have access to basic healthcare - granted it is inefficient and costly - but no one is refused service at hospitals.  Healthcare insurance is not really insurance - which is defined as protection against catastrophic events.  It is basically a non-taxed benefit that large corporations offer to their employees - which is neither fair to the general public nor fair to tax payers.  Perhaps the US should reform the concept of government funding of healthcare and return ownership of healthcare to the doctors and individuals and out of the hands of the government.

Naomi Benzil posted 03 Jan 2010 at 02:23 AM

I am overwhelmed by the comments of those who do not care about the other human beings in their community.  In our interdependent society, no person is an island unto themeselves.  Your self interest has overcome your sense of obligation to the community of people on earth.  I am aware that we can’t solve every problem in health care all at once. It is very difficult to change an inequitable process that has developed for many years.  We must start to right the wrongs of the past by extending health care to all.  The present legislation extends health care to those who have pre-exsting conditions, those who can’t afford to purchase insurance and those unable to care for themselves.  Insurance is shared risk and we need everyone in the ‘pool’ of the insured to make it affordable to all.

Unfortunately this legislation is not driven by the citizens but a compromise of competing self-interests and that many items will not be in force for a few years.  I am confident that future adjustments will provide a more equitable system.

For those who think morals has nothing to do with politics, need to realize that laws are based on our moral values.  Laws about murder didn’t develop from politics.

Those who care about the future health of society need to let their legislators know that it is immoral to deny health care to a third of our population.

 

Goodbye, New York Times

Dear New York Times,

It’s over between us.

For 30 years, I’ve been in love with you, NYT.

I met you soon after I moved here from Chicago. Never before had I read such thoughtful, compellingly written journalism, with dispatches from all over the globe that mirrored my politics and my interests. You opened my eyes, New York Times. Back in Chicago, the papers covered only local news, but you showed me there was a larger world out there, filled with enchanting possibilities.

It was love at first sight. From that very first time, I turned to your editorials and op-ed pages to shape my opinions. I wouldn’t see a movie or a play until I read your reviews. I chose books based on your recommendations. I tore out your recipes and saved them in a special notebook. It was a thrill when my illustrations appeared in your hallowed Sunday Magazine. The papers that described 9/11 and the election of our first black President are preserved lovingly in my basement.

 

 

Greetings, nods, and the art of saying “pajamas”

Walking through the streets of Teaneck this past Shabbos, I started thinking about a “good Shabbos” game my brothers and I used to play each week as we made our way across town.”

“P’jms.”

My 11-year-old brother snickers once the man — who had barely looked up from the sidewalk as he passed but still managed to mutter something resembling “gdshbs” under his breath — is well behind us.

A second opportunity arises. Two women, power-walking, speed past us on the left. They’re absorbed in conversation, but one nods and the other throws a quick “Good Shabbos” over her shoulder. “P’jms,” my brother mumbles. Quickly. It has to be said quickly for both full effect and so as not to be discovered. The women continue on, oblivious to this wordplay.

A minute passes. An approaching teenager with hands in his pockets eyes us from afar and abruptly crosses to the other side of the street. My brother scowls, a pajama-moment taken away from him.

 

 

Superhero spring

The second quarter of 2014 has been rather remarkable for superhero movies, with three different films, “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “The Amazing Spider-Man 2,” and “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” in the theaters all at the same time at one point.

All three movies are adaptations of Marvel Comics, the publishing group launched by Stan Lee (aka Stanley Lieber) in 1961, and purchased by Disney in 2009. Stan Lee was the son of Jewish immigrants from Romania, and as a teenager took a job in 1939 with Timely Publications, the company that he eventually would evolve into Marvel Comics.

 

 

RECENTLYADDED

‘The heart that feels not now is dead’

“It is the good fortune of many to live distant from the scene of sorrow; the evil is not sufficiently brought to their doors to make them feel the precariousness” of those living under conditions of war.

This observation aptly describes the experience of Jews who have been watching increasingly tragic events unfold in Israel from the privileged safety of our American diaspora. These words were penned, however, by Thomas Paine — American author, political theorist, and philosopher — in his celebrated 1776 pamphlet, “Common Sense.” The precarious conditions he described were, specifically, the privations and predations endured by colonists in my native Massachusetts, besieged and subjugated with particular brutality by the British army. Paine wrote in order to arouse sympathy and solidarity among colonists at a distance from the conflict — those, say, in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and South Carolina. His admonition in “The American Crisis” resounds with wisdom for Jews ostensibly far from “the scene of sorrow” during Operation Protective Edge: “It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead.”

 

 

Love thy neighbor

Isn’t it hopeless?

Here we go again, with Hamas attacking Israel from Gaza for the third time, just weeks after the kidnapping and tragic death of three Israeli youngsters and the horrendous act of burning a Palestinian boy alive by our own.

Who can bear it? And how will it ever end? Isn’t it hopeless?

There is a popular chasidic-style song with some significant words for times like these: “We are believers the children of believers….” Well, though it strains belief, in the midst of all this terror and bad blood between Israelis and Palestinians, there was a peace initiative that actually went viral.

 

 

From the narrow places

As a teenager I was a competitive faster — and summer was my season.

As a camper and then as a staffer at Camp Yavneh in Northwood, New Hampshire, I shone in my ability to fast for two long, hot summer days, separated by only three weeks — and the second of those fasts even started at sundown the night before.

Don’t jump to any conclusions. There was no eating disorder involved. If anorexia and bulimia were known at the time, they must have been banned in Boston. It is simply a Jewish ritual that, maximally observed, got you out of swimming for three weeks, without having to plead menstruation, and garnered praise from the more Orthodox among the faculty.

 

 
 
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